Allpowers R600 LiFePO4 power station with 299 Wh in the test

Test: Allpower's R600 power station

The Allpowers company contacted me a few weeks ago and offered me to test their Allpowers R600 power station and write a report about it. Of course, I gladly accepted the offer, because as an old power bank fan, power stations are my dream, so to speak. They have a lot of power, many functions and are incredibly practical.

Transparency notice

As usual, this test report was written without payment and without the manufacturer's intervention. I give you my honest opinion of the product and I don't praise anything that doesn't really deserve praise.

My test is about the Allpowers R600 power station - almost 300 Wh with a wide range of connection options (photos: Sir Apfelot).
My test is about the Allpowers R600 power station - almost 300 Wh with a wide range of connection options (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Power station and solar panel - two products

In this article I am testing the Allpowers R600, but I also ordered a 100 watt solar panel that can be used to charge the power station via a solar cable to an XT60 connector.

Included with the Allpowers solar panels (100 W) The matching MC-600 to XT4 cable is included - just like the R60.

23,81 EUR
ALLPOWERS foldable solar panel 100W solar module Especially for portable power station and outdoor ...
  • ▶ 【Made for solar generators】: ALLPOWERS foldable solar panel 100W is compatible with most solar generators / ...
  • ▶【High Performance Charging】: The battery is made in the USA with an efficiency of up to 22%. 1/3...
  • ▶【Foldable & Portable】: Folded size only 65x51x3cm, 3.58kg easy to take with you. ALLPOWERS solar module is...

Current discounts for power station and solar module

I just saw that Amazon has a 20 EUR discount on the power station and a 10% discount on the solar panel. If you are looking for a small, portable power station with a matching, foldable solar panel, you will find a good offer here that I can recommend and also use myself.
» next Powerstation campaign on Amazon

Important: First activate the 20 euro coupon above and then put both products in the shopping cart via the promotion.

Allpower's R600 power station

Scope of delivery Power station Allpowers R600

The power station package contains the following items:

  • Power station R600
  • MC-4 to XT60 connection cable
  • power cable
  • Carrying case for the cables
  • User Guide
The technical data is also printed on the back of the R600.
The technical data is also printed on the back of the R600.

Technical data

  • Manufacturer: Allpowers
  • Model: R600-EU
  • Battery chemistry: LiFePO4
  • Capacity: 299Wh (25,6V * 11,68Ah)
  • Voltage: V 230
  • Output: 2x 600W
  • Wireless charging: yes, Qi charging
  • Charging power AC input: 400 W
  • Charging power solar input: 300 W (XT-60 connector)
  • UPS function: yes, < 10ms switching time
  • Flashlight function: yes
  • Types of protection: high temperature protection, low temperature protection, overcharge protection, deep discharge protection, overload protection, short circuit protection, overcurrent protection
  • Weight: 5,8 kg
  • Dimensions: 28,5 19,5 x x 19 cm
  • App control: yes (App store link)
  • Temperature range charging: 0°C to 40°C
  • Discharging temperature range: -10°C to 40°C
  • Simultaneous charging and discharging: yes
  • References: Amazon
ALLPOWERS R600 portable power station, 299Wh LiFePO4 battery with 2x 600W (1200W peak) AC output...
  • 【Charge 8 devices at the same time】: The ALLPOWERS R600 portable power station has 2* pure sine wave ...
  • 【Large capacity with quick charging】: The ALLPOWERS R600 has a large capacity battery of 299Wh, which ...
  • 【Fast charging with solar】: Use clean, green renewable energy to charge the R600 solar generator in just 2 ...

outputs

  • 2x socket (230 V, 600 W, 1200 W peak, pure sine wave)
  • 2x 100 W USB-C (USB-C power delivery)
  • 2x 18W USB-A
  • 2x 12V/10A
  • 1x cigarette lighter (12V/10A)
  • 1x 15W wireless charging
The scope of delivery includes such an MC4 to XT60 connection cable to connect standard solar modules to the power bank.
The scope of delivery includes such an MC4 to XT60 connection cable to connect standard solar modules to the power bank.

Update 25.08.2023/XNUMX/XNUMX: Charging via cigarette lighter

I was just asked if there is a way to charge the Allpowers R600 from the car battery. Yes, this is also possible by feeding the 12 volts into the XT60 socket, which is normally used for the solar panels.

For this purpose, Allpowers offers an adapter cable from cigarette lighter to XT60, which you here at Amazon place.

ALLPOWERS car cigarette lighter to XT60 power pole connection, solar extension cable, 1,5 m, 14...
  • Cigarette Lighter to XT60 Cable: One end is cigarette lighter suitable for cars with 12V output and trucks with...
  • Minimize the loss: 14 AWG solar extension cable, length 1,5 m, quite long enough, but it is very...
  • 【Durable Material】High quality material ensures the transmission in the stable situation. Durable...

Bluetooth pairing only in the app

One thing I fell for right at the start is pairing the app with the power station. I thought you open the Bluetooth menu in the iPhone, find the power station at the bottom and then connect it.

However, the Powerstation never appeared there. I even wrote to support because I couldn't get any further here.

The trick is: the connection between smartphone and power station takes place in the app. So you open the Allpowers2 app, find your power station model there and add it to your account.

Allpowers app: not recommended

The Allpowers app (Apple App Store / Google Play Store) itself is well-intentioned and also provides some information like charging status, but it's not as if the app is indispensable. I installed it, opened it a few times and then stopped using it.

One of the main reasons I stopped using them is the unreliable Bluetooth connection. Whenever you don't use the app for a few minutes and the iPhone goes to sleep, the app somehow loses connection to the power station and you have to reconnect it when you start the app. This only lasts a few seconds, but it's annoying enough that you don't want to use the app anymore.

There is also an account requirement for the app: you have to register with Allpowers in order to be able to use the app. This is a reason for many people not to use the app.

Left: Account Compulsion; middle: establish connection with power station; Right: Power station management view.
Left: compulsory account; middle: establish connection with power station; Right: Power station management view.

Processing and appearance of the power bank

If you look at the Allpowers Powerstation, you could also pass it off as a men's handbag. It has a fold-out carrying handle on the top and is also super handy at almost 6 kilograms.

The power station has a clean finish and will certainly withstand rough handling. The displays are easy to read and the keys (except for one) have small LEDs so that you can find them in the dark.

The display provides information about what percentage of the capacity is still available and also shows the current outgoing and incoming power in watts.

At the bottom of the display there is still an estimate of how many hours and minutes the power station will currently last with the current power consumption before it reaches 0%.

At the bottom of the clock symbol you will find the remaining running time with the current power output in minutes (photos: Sir Apfelot).
At the bottom of the clock symbol you will find the remaining running time with the current power output in minutes (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Charging and discharging the power station

My first test was charging the power station from 0 to 100% using the supplied power cable. According to the product description, this process should be possible within an hour.

In my test, the charge, which sometimes used over 300 watts, was only done after almost 2 hours. That's nowhere near what the manufacturer promises, but I think 2 hours is still okay.

When charging via the solar panel, which delivers a maximum of 100 watts, you have to plan more time accordingly.

Charging via the mains plug takes a little less than two hours, as you can see in the graph of my meter here.
Charging via the mains plug takes a little less than two hours, as you can see in the graph of my meter here.

Loud fan noise

I haven't had any experience with other power stations so far and I think they all need to turn on a fan here and there for cooling. The Allpowers R600 does the same.

When you charge the power station or draw power from it, the fan starts up every few minutes. The fan noise is not regulated, but always appears to be "full power". The device is correspondingly loud. It's significantly closer to a hair dryer than a PC that's airing.

During the tests, the device was often in my office and it was pretty annoying. Of course, how often the fan starts depends on how much electricity you draw. But here is an example:

I had a 50 watt lamp on the 230 volt connection. After every 4 minutes, the fan ran for about 2,5 minutes.

It also seems to me that the fan is only active when the power station is being charged via the mains plug or when you are querying 230 volts via the inverter. If you only activated the USB-C and USB-A outputs and use them to charge devices, the fan does not start.

I think a less noisy fan would be a good improvement for the power station, but you always have to keep the price in mind and that's where the Allpowers R600 scores.

On the front you can see the connections and controls. The mains connection and the XT60 port for the solar module are located on the right side of the power station.
On the front you can see the connections and controls. The mains connection and the XT60 port for the solar module are located on the right side of the power station.

Various connection options

As you can already see in the technical data, the variety of connections is quite decent.

In addition to the two Schuko sockets, there are two USB-C sockets, two USB-A sockets, a cigarette lighter connection and two sockets for 12-volt hollow plugs. There is also a Qi charging surface on top of the power station, which you can use to charge AirPods or iPhones.

Unfortunately, the Apple Watch still relies on its special closing time and can therefore only be charged with a charging cable on the USB-A or USB-C port.

You can use all of this at the same time. This means that a MacBook Pro, iPhone, iPad and more can be charged with the appropriate sockets, while other consumers can be connected to the Schuko sockets.

But I think the maximum power output is more the limit here than the number of connections. A kettle, a stovetop or similar is simply too much for the 600 W output power.

A charger for laptops, drones or a lamp, on the other hand, is not a problem.

The flap hides the socket for the mains plug, a fuse and the XT60 socket, which can be used for the solar module.
The flap hides the socket for the mains plug, a fuse and the XT60 socket, which can be used for the solar module.

Capacity specification of 299 Wh realistic?

To test this, I discharged the power station completely, then I charged it completely and then I discharged it again from 100% to 0%.

  • When charging from 0 to 100% it used 390 Wh.
  • When discharging from 100 to 0% via one of the built-in sockets, it released 252 Wh.

I could probably have put more power out of the low voltage outlets, but the 230 volt connections shut off at 5% battery level.

The two buttons that you see on the left allow you to activate the 230V inverter and the USB outputs separately. This saves energy as the inverter consumes power even when there is no load.

Charging via 100 watt solar panel

The power station can be conveniently charged with any solar panel via the XT60 socket. Even the normal solar panels that you find in the balcony power plants can be connected to the power bank with the MC-4 to XT60 cable.

The maximum charging power is 300 watts, although I only connected a 100W solar panel.

I charged the power station with the solar panel for a good 25 minutes and the charging power was just over 70 watts. In the time mentioned, the power station has filled from 0 to 11%. And the fan didn't even start.

The Allpowers R600 has an XT60 socket, which can be used to charge the power station using photovoltaics.
The Allpowers R600 has an XT60 socket, which can be used to charge the power station using photovoltaics.

If you have sun all day and make sure that you keep aligning the solar module to the sun, you can even charge the power station with a 100 watt panel.

If you need more power, you can get that too All-power 200 watts and Allpowers 400 watt module look at. This makes it correspondingly faster.

Overall, however, I am surprised by the ease with which you can charge the power station with a relatively handy folding module.

With my small 100 watt solar module, the power station shows a remaining charging time of 3 hours. With this you can actually charge the power station in one afternoon.
With my small 100 watt solar module, the power station shows a remaining charging time of 3 hours. With this you can actually charge the power station in one afternoon.

Tried USB-C and USB-A ports

The power station has two USB-A and two USB-C outputs. The USB-C outputs each have 100 watts of USB power delivery and the USB-A outputs each offer 18 watts of output power.

To test USB-C performance, I attached the MacBook Pro, which at times drew over 90 watts of power. This is a value that it also queries on the power supply unit. So you can say that it can be charged just as quickly on the power station as on the original power supply from Apple.

I tested the USB-A outputs with a USB load resistor and was also able to access the 18 watts. The outputs switched off when the output power exceeded 20 watts.

It is interesting that the internal fans of the Allpowers R600 did not start when I only used power via the USB outputs.

My verdict on the Allpowers R600 is quite positive - despite the loud fan, which fortunately doesn't start often.
My verdict on the Allpowers R600 is quite positive - despite the loud fan, which fortunately doesn't start often.

My conclusion

I have to say I'm a bit torn. On the one hand, it's nice that the power station is so small, but on the other hand, the 299 Wh are used up relatively quickly when you connect 230 volt devices to the device.

The handy size, which the device has in contrast to the larger power stations with 2 or 3 kilowatt hours, is again a plus point.

I would describe the power station as a large camping power bank that you can charge with solar panels - and it works quite well and not as badly as some people have said Solar power banks .

On the top of the R600 you will find another way to charge devices wirelessly via Qi charging.
On the top of the R600 you will find another way to charge devices wirelessly via Qi charging.

My recommendation for the application areas is charging small devices between iPhone, iPad, drone and MacBook Pro. I would only use the 230 volt output in exceptional cases, since the inverter in it consumes electricity even without a load - and the power station simply doesn't have that much of it because the capacity isn't huge.

Conclusion: The Allpowers R600 is just right for a camping weekend or a camping week with friends with a solar panel. Not too big, easy to transport and much more capacity than a pure power bank would offer.

The price is also very good considering the versatility of ports and charging options. By the way, you can find them here Amazon or via this product box:

ALLPOWERS R600 portable power station, 299Wh LiFePO4 battery with 2x 600W (1200W peak) AC output...
  • 【Charge 8 devices at the same time】: The ALLPOWERS R600 portable power station has 2* pure sine wave ...
  • 【Large capacity with quick charging】: The ALLPOWERS R600 has a large capacity battery of 299Wh, which ...
  • 【Fast charging with solar】: Use clean, green renewable energy to charge the R600 solar generator in just 2 ...

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The page contains affiliate links / images: Amazon.de

12 comments on "Allpowers R600 LiFePO4 power station with 299 Wh in the test"

  1. Hi, cool piece. Might be something for me, especially in combination with the solar panel. Unfortunately there is an error in the title, it says 299 kWh, 299 Wh would be correct - this is also listed correctly later in the text. Greetings and thank you for the article.

    1. Hello NHN! Thanks for the hint. 299 kWh… that would be cool. 😂 I could take care of our house for 100 days! I'll fix it right away...

    2. Hello
      over a longer period of time, the problems arise. I have 3 of them. They've all been replaced before... still problems.
      1. Cheap plastic
      2. only problems when charging outdoors in sub-zero temperatures

      Despite calibration, they keep changing. Display and battery have problems. I advise against purchasing...

      1. Hello Karl-Heinz! Thanks for your assessment. If you've already used three of them, then I'm sure your experience is more sound than mine. I've been using it for a while, but the constant ventilation is kind of annoying... I'll have to test Bluetti to see if they do it better. LG. Jens

  2. Hello, I may have overlooked it, but I didn't read anything about the performance mode that can be unlocked via the app. This can be used, for example, to operate a 1200 watt hair dryer. The power of the hair dryer is reduced to just under 600W. For me, the power is somewhere between level 1 and 2. So it's enough to blow-dry your nose hair ;) Drills, grinders, etc. that don't have more than 1200 watts also run great in power mode. Every refrigerator used to run with it. (Mine runs with 40W consumption for 13 hours at a room temperature of around 20 degrees) It is also worth mentioning that Qi charging is torture, at least with an iPhone 13pro Max. Keeps breaking. And when it loads then max with 7-9 watts. My Android phones all charge with 15 W via Qi. Thanks to the 100 W USB-C outputs, you save on an additional charging adapter. And you can easily charge the iPhones with up to 27 watts. So a little faster than with the original charger. You can operate large panels on the R600, at least up to 60V and 12A. However, I have not yet managed to charge the power station with more than 265W. Doesn't seem to work anymore.
    The only really annoying thing is the uncontrolled (no PWM) fan, which even runs when only the AC sockets are activated without plugging in a consumer. After 20 minutes, the fan runs every 2 minutes. for 20-30 sec. This is better regulated with the E3BA from Bluetti. There, the fan is much quieter and, above all, regulated. You rarely hear him. Yes, that's it for now :)

    1. Hello HK! Thanks for your hints. I had also heard that the Bluetti does it better, but ok... it's also a bit more expensive. I just always think that such a fan control would have produced 50 cents in material costs - every buyer would have gladly gilded that with an additional purchase price of 10 euros. So actually saved at the wrong end.

      Re. of performance mode: Thanks for explaining it to me. I saw it in the app and then asked support what exactly it does. They referred me to the instructions, where I couldn't find anything (maybe I'm blind). But now I understand what he really does. That's interesting and a good solution, I think!

      Re. I didn't have any problems with Qi charging and I don't think the iPhones charge as quickly as the Androids. So it doesn't get any better with other chargers if the iPhone doesn't get active cooling.

      1. Of course I meant the EB3A from Bluetti, but this has the disadvantage that it gets a bit alarmingly warm in warm environments. (I've already measured 82 degrees inside when using it outside) That's just the disadvantage of the quieter fan ;) That's why the Bluetti is also on the desk, only the computer and the router are connected to it. For outdoor use I use the R600. Oh yes, Bluetti is known for the fact that they also use loud fans. So far, the EB3A is actually the only Bluetti device with a very pleasant fan noise.

        I paid EUR 220 for the Bluetti and I was able to snag the R600 for 240. There was even the cooler bag for free, which Allpowers normally offers individually for a rather overpriced EUR 70. At least in my case I can't confirm that the Bluetti would be more expensive ;)

        Both devices are not perfect. EB3A has the quieter cooler that only really gets a little louder if you get high wattage out of the device for several minutes (keyword hair dryer). In addition, the Bluetti does not remain voltage stable for as long as the R600. At 40% charge my fridge wouldn't start anymore. My friend's Bluetti made it to 25%. The R600 runs down to the 5%. I also think it's good that Allpowers closes the AC connection at 5%. The Bluetti always runs down to 0 percent, at least visually. But think that there is still a little reserve to protect the batteries from being completely discharged.

        In any case, I am satisfied with both devices, especially for the price. For the R600 I'll get a quieter fan though. It's also pretty easy to swap out. All you have to do is unscrew the side panel and you have the fan right in front of you.

        1. The Bluetti EB3A looks great! Is a good alternative to the Allpowers fan monster. 😂 But does the tension really change when the Bluetti is down to 40%? That would be strange. It's actually still the feel-good capacity of a battery... Well, it's probably like you say: both have their advantages and disadvantages.

  3. Just wanted to give a little feedback on what's going on here. I have or had 2 R600s in use here. Both are now broken. (Both less than 3 months in use)
    One can only be discharged if there is voltage at the input. This activates UPS mode. If you turn it on without a solar panel or other voltage at the input, it will turn off immediately, although charged to 100 percent.
    On the second R600, a condenser blew off with a bang and a small cloud of smoke. The device still works, but without the fan, which quickly leads to overheating.
    My neighbor also got an R600. This had a total failure after 3 weeks. All 3 R600 were operated on Allpowers panels.
    There was a refund for one R600, the other unfortunately had no guarantee because Allpowers provided it free of charge.
    Annoyingly, Allpowers does not want to help me to repair the second R600, even for a fee. The support said I should “throw away” the device. I hope the word was mistranslated. However, support has not been in touch for over a week now. Allpowers normally responded to my emails within 24 hours.
    In any case, I won't be buying anything from Allpowers for the time being.
    Maybe I can find someone who can get the two R600s up and running again. Not much can be broken.
    At least my Bluetti EB3A continues to run without problems. And in contrast to the R600, it's nice and quiet :)

    I hope that your experiences will be a little better than mine in the future :)

    1. Hello HK! Thank you for your detailed feedback. So far my R600 is still running. I've charged them a few times with the 100 watt solar panel and so far nothing has broken. But funnily enough, Bluetti contacted me in the meantime and offered to test the Bluetti EB3A. I gladly accepted the offer and will soon write a review about it. I'm really excited about the device.

  4. Hello, my experience with Allpowers R600 the fan is annoying at AC load but the worst thing I didn't know is .
    If I have connected a consumer of AC 7 watts, the power station does not manage to stay online if 40 watts of solar power come in during the day, i.e. the inverter needs its own power of a good 15-20 watts and drains the battery.
    Even when charging in silent mode 100Watt power cable, it draws 0Wh from 100-420%. If it is full, the power station continues to consume 15-20 watts without anything being connected.

    1. Hello Bernhard! Yes, that's annoying, but unfortunately a point that affects all power stations. The inverters all consume electricity as soon as they are running. Even with the large Bluetti Power Stations for over 2000 euros, the inverter consumes 50 watts in standby. Seen in this way, this is not a point that the Allpowers Power Station could be blamed for.

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