Anker 737 (PowerCore 24K) – 140 watt MacBook power bank in review

Anker 737 24K PowerCore power bank review

At just under 737 euros BUVP, the Anker 150 power bank is definitely the most expensive power bank that I have been able to test so far. But with 140 watts of output power, it is definitely the most powerful. The question is, of course, can the power bank actually deliver this power? And who needs such a power bank? Can you actually charge a MacBook Pro with it? All questions to which I would like to provide answers in this article.

Transparency notice

Anker gave me the power bank for the test free of charge. The package also included a 140 watt USB-C charging cable and a 65 watt USB-C GaNPrime power supply. The three devices form a very good set, because most charging cables currently do not support 140 watts of power, but only 100 watts. And the small GaNPrime power supply is also very powerful and can quickly charge the power bank.

As always, my test is written neutrally and of course I don't mince my words if I notice negative points that I would like to criticize.

Anker sent me a complete set of their GaNPrime products: charger, cable and power bank – but this review is only about the Anker 737 24K PowerCore power bank (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Anker sent me a complete set of their GaNPrime products: charger, cable and power bank – but this review is only about the Anker 737 24K PowerCore power bank (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Technical specifications of the Anker 737 PowerCore additional battery

The technical data of the battery are quite exciting, which is why I would like to summarize them here:

  • Manufacturer: Anker
  • Model: Anker 737 PowerCore 24K
  • Model No.: A1289
  • Capacity: 24.000 mAh / 86,4 Wh
  • Temperature protection: ActiveShield 2.0
  • Dimensions: 156 x 55 x 50 mm
  • Weight: 630 g
  • USB Power Delivery: yes, USB PD 3.1 (up to 140W)
  • PowerIQ: 4.0
  • Ports: 2x USB-C (USB PD 3.1), 1x USB-A
  • Charging power: 140 watts (total)
  • USB-C1 input: 5V, 3A // 9V, 3A // 15V, 3A // 20V, 5A // 28V, 5A
  • USB-C1 Output: 5V, 3A // 9V, 3A // 15V, 3A // 20V, 5A // 28V, 5A
  • USB-C2 Output: 5V, 3A // 9V, 3A // 15V, 3A // 20V, 5A // 28V, 5A
  • USB-A output: 5V, 3A // 9V, 2A // 12V, 1,5A
  • Charging the power bank: approx. 60-60 min (with 125 watt power supply)
  • Trickle charging of devices: yes (trickle charging)
  • Load through: yes
  • Accessories: transport bag and short USB-C charging cable (USB PD 3.1 compatible)
  • Price: approx. 150 EUR (here on amazon)
The fabric bag doesn't really offer the power bank much protection during transport. Therefore, a customer recommends buying a case for a mobile speaker, in which the power bank fits quite well.

The fabric bag doesn't really offer the power bank much protection during transport. Therefore, a customer recommends buying a case for a mobile speaker, in which the power bank fits quite well.

At this point, a little tip from an Amazon customer: He found the fabric bag too thin and found that the power bank fits perfectly into a Case for the Anker SoundCore 1/2 fits. This gives you reasonable transport protection for the power bank.

Anker 737 power bank (PowerCore 24K), 24.000mAh external battery with 3 connections, 140W power,...
  • POWERFUL CHARGING PERFORMANCE ON BOTH SIDES: Equipped with the latest Power Delivery 3.1 and bidirectional technology to ...
  • POWERFUL CAPACITY: With a battery capacity of 24.000 mAh and a battery life that is twice as long, you can ...
  • SMART DISPLAY: The easy-to-read digital display shows the output and input power and the estimated time ...

Look and design of the Anker 737 24K power bank

The Anker Powerbank is not only special because of the high price. The processing, the optics and the features are somehow from another planet.

It looks elegant, has extremely high-quality workmanship, feels good in the hand and the one button that is used for all operations is easy to find and great to use.

The built-in display, which I have never seen in any power bank, deserves special attention. It not only shows the available capacity, but you can scroll through different views with the button and also see the following data:

  • Residual capacity in percent (as already mentioned)
  • current performance on each port (inbound or outbound)
  • Remaining time, how long the power bank would last with the current withdrawal (hours and minutes)
  • Remaining time, how long it will take until the power bank needs to be fully charged when charging
  • Temperature of the power bank in °C and °F (measured 3 million times a day to protect the battery from overheating)
  • Battery health percentage
  • all Wh that have flowed into the power bank so far
  • all Wh that have been withdrawn so far
  • number of charging cycles
  • Activations of the display

So you get a lot of information about the battery and the current charging process. Personally, I am very enthusiastic about this, because I like to know how many watts the connected iPhones, iPads or MacBooks are currently charging.

The power bank is already quite shiny, but it is nice that the displays are quite extensive and provide details about the charging process across all ports.

The power bank is already quite shiny, but it is nice that the displays are quite extensive and provide details about the charging process across all ports.

How much is 24.000mAh?

The Anker power bank has a capacity of 24.000 mAh. Of course, that doesn't mean much to most people when it comes to what you can charge with it in practice. For a better understanding of how much power is in the battery, Anker provides this data. One battery charge is enough to...

  • Charge an iPhone 13 (not Max) 4,9 times.
  • charge a Samsung Galaxy S22 4,5 times.
  • charge a MacBook Air 2020 (M1) 1,3 times.

And another special feature of the battery is that it can be charged extremely quickly even via USB-C. The Anker 52 power bank was charged from 737% to 0% in about 100 minutes. This is really a special feature, because the batteries I had before were only full after about two or three hours, even with USB C Power Delivery.

Here you can see the display when charging my iPad - a very old iPad, which is why it only charges with 7 watts here.

Here you can see the display when charging my iPad - a very old iPad, which is why it only charges with 7 watts here.

Power distribution when charging with 1, 2 or 3 devices

With chargers and power banks, it is always interesting to see how the power is distributed when you connect multiple devices. For example, some power adapters only deliver high performance through a specific USB-C port and the others offer significantly less charging current.

In order to provide clarity here, Anker has a detailed list of the charging current that the devices can query for various configurations:

  • A device on either of the two USB-C ports (USB-A not assigned): up to 140 watts (regardless of which of the two ports is used).
  • One device on each USB-C port, but USB-A port not occupied: The two devices share the charging current dynamically, but the total can be a maximum of 140 watts.
  • One device on a USB-C port and one on the USB-A port: The USB-C port receives a maximum of 100 watts and the USB-A port a maximum of 18 watts.
  • Each port occupied by a device: The USB-C ports dynamically share 122 watts, while the device receives a maximum of 18 watts on the USB-A port.
In my test, I charge the power bank with the most powerful power supply that Apple has to offer: the 140 watt power supply.

In my test, I charge the power bank with the most powerful power supply that Apple has to offer: the 140 watt power supply.

Test: Charging the power bank on the Apple 140W USB-C power adapter

I thought that to test how quickly the power bank itself can be charged, I would use the thickest USB-C power adapter I own: the Apple USB-C power adapter with 140 watts. My ulterior motive was that the power bank would certainly draw a lot of electricity if it wanted to fully charge itself in 52 minutes.

I completely discharged the power bank itself until it was at 0%. Then I plugged it into the Apple power supply with my USB-C multimeter and immediately found out that the display in the multimeter was not designed for these current levels. I only saw something around 28 watts on the watt display, but the voltage and current told me that there were well over 100 watts flowing.

The photo is poor, as it was very sunny in the room, but you might still see on the display that it's charging at 124 watts (photos: Sir Apfelot).

The photo is poor, as it was very sunny in the room, but you might still see on the display that it's charging at 124 watts (photos: Sir Apfelot).

I then unplugged my USB-C multimeter and simply used the internal display of the power bank, because this also shows me how much power is currently flowing into the additional battery.

Immediately after plugging it in, the power was still 87 watts, which I found very enormous. Within the next few minutes, it continued to rise and then leveled off at around 124 watts.

Charging was extremely fast. You could practically watch how the power bank filled up percentage by percentage. After about 30 minutes I was already at almost 80% and in the end only the last 20% cost a lot of time because the power bank uses the last few minutes to adjust the voltage of the individual cells. The process is called "balancing" and is familiar to most people who deal with Lipo batteries.

Here you can see the 3 ports that you can use to charge devices with the power bank (2x USB-C, 1x USB-A). You can charge three devices at the same time and are only limited to a total output of approx. 140 watts.

Here you can see the 3 ports that you can use to charge devices with the power bank (2x USB-C, 1x USB-A). You can charge three devices at the same time and are only limited to a total output of approx. 140 watts.

My measurements and test with the Anker Powerbank

I did a few more tests with the power bank on my iPad Pro (12,9 inch), my MacBook (12 inch, ancient!) and my MacBook Pro (14 inch, M1 Max). The following results came out:

Fully charge and discharge the power bank

I always find the specification of 24.000 mAh unhelpful, since it is only an indication of the capacity of the built-in cells, which in turn is provided by the manufacturer of the current ones.

In order to get more clarity and more practical values ​​here, I completely discharged the power bank, then charged it completely and discharged it again to 0% and measured the amount of energy that flowed in each case.

The following values ​​came out:

  • Full charge: 85 Wh
  • Discharge complete: 81 Wh

If the values ​​are correct, the power bank has an energy efficiency of 95%, which would surprise me, because even that Zendure A8 power bank with very good cells only comes to 84% in my measurements - and that is also a realistic value. In my experience, the "loss" when charging power banks is more like 15 to 20% and I was able to read about it on other websites. If I find time, I will measure the above values ​​again and correct the information if necessary.

The power bank is completely controlled with this one button. You can also scroll through different data views for the power bank.

The power bank is completely controlled with this one button. You can also scroll through different data views for the power bank.

iPad Pro 12,9 inches

I was able to bring the iPad Pro from 5% to 100% and the power bank lost about 55% of its charge. Mathematically, one can say that an iPad Pro (the large version) can be fully charged about twice.

MacBook Pro 14 inch (M1 Max)

With the MacBook Pro, I gained about 20% charge in the MBP after charging for 34 minutes and lost about 42% charge in the Anker battery. So you shouldn't get the MacBook Pro from 0% to 100% with a full power bank.

The charging speed is breathtaking, because the charging power was around 20 to 85 watts in the 93 minutes. That's more than the included 87-watt power supply from Apple can handle. Just a little more, but still: Wow!

MacBook 12 inches

My small MacBook charged with 20 watts in 28 minutes (the MacBook doesn't ask for more). It has charged 14% and the power bank has discharged by 12%. You could fully charge the MacBook 12 inch with the Anker power bank a little more than once.

However, the charging speed is not slow because of the power bank, but because the MacBook does not have built-in charging electronics that support fast charging. It's one of the first USB-C MacBooks, which is why many of today's charging standards didn't exist back then.

The main area of ​​application for the Anker 737 power bank is probably charging MacBook models, because only these make halfway use of the immense charging capacity of the battery (photos: Sir Apfelot).

The main area of ​​application for the Anker 737 power bank is probably charging MacBook models, because only these make halfway use of the immense charging capacity of the battery (photos: Sir Apfelot).

AirPods and Apple Watch charge with Trickle Charging

The term trickle charging is translated into German as "trickle charging", but basically it is a charging mode intended for devices with low charging current requirements. Of course, you can also keep your iPhone at 100% for weeks using trickle charging, but that's probably not a good idea.

But if you want to charge an Apple Watch, a Magic Mouse or the AirPods, you often have the problem with other power banks that charging stops after a few seconds because the charging current is so low that the power bank "thinks" the connected one Device is fully charged.

The Anker 737 PowerCore 24K Powerbank supports trickle charging, which can be activated (and deactivated again) by double-tapping the button. Trickle charging is marked with a green dot in the display.

Trickle Charging can also be used to charge devices with a low charging current: AirPods, AirPods Pro, Apple Watch and Magic Mouse, for example.

Trickle Charging can also be used to charge devices with a low charging current: AirPods, AirPods Pro, Apple Watch and Magic Mouse, for example.

My conclusion for Anker 737 24k power bank

If you look around for power banks that actually deliver 80 or more watts to charge a MacBook Pro, you quickly realize that the selection is not that big anymore and the available alternatives are also within the price range of the Anker power bank.

Many power banks also advertise with the term "MacBook Pro", but if you look at the specifications, you will usually find out that the maximum output voltage is only 12 volts and high-power charging is not possible with it.

The Anker Powerbank, on the other hand, delivers up to 28 volts and 5 amperes, and thus ends up with a maximum of 140 watts – even the most powerful Apple power supply currently does not manage more.

But not only the high performance is impressive. The associated loading speeds are also incredible. The power bank itself is fully charged in under an hour and even a 16 inch MacBook Pro from 2021 takes the power bank from 40 to 0% in 50 minutes.

Before I saw the power bank, I certainly would not have spent so much money on the device. But after my tests I am very convinced of the additional battery and would buy it myself.

When charging my ancient MacBook, the Anker 737 24K PowerCore Powerbank got really bored, because the Mac simply requires very little power to charge.

When charging my ancient MacBook, the Anker 737 24K PowerCore Powerbank got really bored, because the Mac simply requires very little power to charge.

The target group of the 140 watt power bank

Now, of course, one wonders who the target group is for such a powerful power bank. I would say that MacBook owners in particular will benefit from the performance of the power bank.

Of course, the iPad Pro also charges with a high charging current and works perfectly with the Anker battery, but there are of course cheaper power banks for the iPad and iPhone - they don't look as chic and don't have the detailed, colored display of the current charge level.

Anyone who likes to invest money in high-quality things is definitely not wrong with the Anker 737 PowerCore 24K Powerbank. You will find the power bank here on amazon or via this product box:

Anker 737 power bank (PowerCore 24K), 24.000mAh external battery with 3 connections, 140W power,...
  • POWERFUL CHARGING PERFORMANCE ON BOTH SIDES: Equipped with the latest Power Delivery 3.1 and bidirectional technology to ...
  • POWERFUL CAPACITY: With a battery capacity of 24.000 mAh and a battery life that is twice as long, you can ...
  • SMART DISPLAY: The easy-to-read digital display shows the output and input power and the estimated time ...

What does the power bank display show me?

In order to understand the indications on the display, the following photograph from the manual is actually the best approach. Here you can see all the elements that you see when switching through.

The individual elements of the display are explained here. Unfortunately, the printed instructions are only black and white, while the power bank's display is colourful.

The individual elements of the display are explained here. Unfortunately, the printed instructions are only black and white, while the power bank's display is colourful.

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The page contains affiliate links / images: Amazon.de

4 comments

  1. Adam says:

    When you connect an iPad without a PD to the Anker's USB-A port, it draws 12W. The Anker's USB-C ports are not profiled for more than 7W.

    • Jen Kleinholz says:

      Hello Adam! I do not know what you mean. the iPad without PD polls no more than 12 watts. And the USB-C ports can demonstrably handle significantly more than 7 watts, namely 140 W.

  2. Sebastian says:

    A little tip: You can also use it to charge your Mavic / Mini / Avata drone battery. For the new Avata, that's enough to charge 2x flight batteries and 1x glasses battery on the go. I'm not sure if the 140W charging power will come into play - I'll have to try it when I get my battery. In any case, you could charge at least 2x 65W (power of the charger recommended by DJI) in parallel, which saves a lot of time.

    • Jen Kleinholz says:

      Thanks, that's a good idea! I hadn't thought of it, but USB-C is just so handy. 😊 And 2x 65 watts is close to the limit, but it still packs it.

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