EDC knife - a knife you always have with you - my pick of the KW10

EDC knife - Pick of the KW10

Every one of you knows pocket knives. Practical little foldable knives that you carry in your pocket. Experience has shown that pocket knives have 20 functions, 19 of which are not needed. So most of the time you carry useless stuff around. After realizing this, I gave up the topic of pocket knives many years ago and no longer had my knife with me.

EDC stands for every day carry - so an EDC knife is one that you always have with you - like me (photos: Sir Apfelot).

EDC stands for every day carry - so an EDC knife is one that you always have with you - like me (photos: Sir Apfelot).

EDC knives - the all-day-carry knives

To be honest, I didn't even know the term "EDC knife". I only got to know him after I had a customer in the field of outdoor knives and had to do a little research on this type of knife.

Basically, they are folding knives that you can open and close with one hand. In the best case, they also have a belt clip on the back, with which you can attach the knife to your belt. In any case, that was an important feature for me in making my purchase decision.

My first EDC knife was the Wolfgangs "Culturo" folding knife. It looks great and the workmanship is also good if it hadn't lost a few important parts after a few months.

My first EDC knife was the Wolfgangs "Culturo" folding knife. It looks great and the workmanship is also good if it hadn't lost a few important parts after a few months.

Loose screws on knife

I had already bought an EDC knife from the well-known German brand Wolfgangs a few months ago - that Wolfgang's Culture. The knife is very well made, feels great in the hand and looks good. It also served me well for many months until I finally noticed that the handle was becoming unstable.

Unfortunately, at some point a screw fell out of my Wolfgangs Culturo, which unfortunately made the handle very wobbly.

Unfortunately, at some point a screw fell out of my Wolfgangs Culturo, which unfortunately made the handle very wobbly.

The reason for this was a screw that had come loose and, of course, disappeared somewhere. A spacer and a counterpart to the screw also fell out with the screw, leaving me unable to repair the knife. I'm still considering whether I'll just have the neighbor weld the part together, but that's another story.

I ended up getting a new EDC knife (the Kubey Momentum KU344) ordered and I am also very satisfied with this. However, I will check every few months that the screws are still tight.

The Kubey Momentum is the new EDC knife I've gotten. So far it's been a loyal companion that's also damn sharp.

The Kubey Momentum is the new EDC knife I've gotten. So far it's been a loyal companion that's also damn sharp.

Do you really need such an EDC knife?

In my opinion, the biggest advantages that the EDC knife has over the classic pocket knife are as follows:

  • more comfortable handling because it fits better in the hand
  • larger blade, which is also firmly locked and offers a lower risk of injury
  • Attachment to the belt and not "flying around" in your pocket
The folding knives have a lock that prevents the blade from collapsing during use (photos: Sir Apfelot).

The folding knives have a lock that prevents the blade from collapsing during use (photos: Sir Apfelot).

And yes, I was amazed at how often I actually need the knife in everyday life. Here are a few uses where I am always happy to have a knife on my belt that I always have with me:

  • Opening packages
  • Opening plastic packages in the house and garden (dry dog ​​food, potting soil, wood pellets, chicken feed, etc.)
  • Cutting off any loose threads on clothing
  • Cutting flowers or vines in the garden
  • Cutting cheese and bread when you're spontaneously hungry after shopping
  • Sharing apples on the go when the kids and the dog fight over the one apple you packed for yourself because nobody wanted one when you asked while packing
  • Opening beer bottles
  • Passing the knife on to those in need who are struggling with any of the above but do not have a knife themselves

Of course I could come up with a lot more things if I stretched my brain a few minutes longer, but actually the above are enough to talk yourself into buying such a knife.

The belt clip on the EDC knives is actually the best feature, because you always have the knife with you and ready to hand.

The belt clip on the EDC knives is actually the best feature, because you always have the knife with you and ready to hand.

I've always had an EDC knife on my belt for many months and I don't want to be without it anymore. I can't say exactly which knife you should take, as I only used two knives. However, I can recommend both – but check the screws every now and then. ;-)

Here are the links to both EDC knives:

And here are the product boxes from Amazon and if you want to browse more, then click hereto go to the search for EDC knives on Amazon:

Wolfgangs CULTRO two-hand knife folding knife made of the finest D2 steel - legal pocket knife...
  • UNIVERSAL APPLICATION - Whether you use the Cultro folding knife as a rescue knife, fishing knife, survival knife, hiking knife...
  • STYLISH GIFT BOX - Are you looking for something high-quality and stable? Something that would also make an excellent gift...
  • PRACTICAL AND HANDY - Strong set together with a practical Kydex holster. Whether on the belt or backpack...
Kubey Momentum KU344B pocket knife
  • Folding knife with 8,7 cm carbonitride-titanium drop point blade made of D2 steel with flat grind
  • Glass fiber reinforced G10 handle
  • With practical fastening clip made of stainless steel
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The page contains affiliate links / images: Amazon.de

11 comments

  1. Kai-Uwe Schneider says:

    Nothing beats the original: Opinel :-)

  2. coloredwolf says:

    can one-hand knives with a lock actually be carried freely? Shouldn't it be in a case so that at least two hands are needed to operate it?

    • Jen Kleinholz says:

      Update: I was wrong. The Culturo is a two-handed knife and must therefore remain under 12 cm blade length in order to carry it legally. However, the other knife is a one-hand knife and these are generally prohibited in Germany. ––– End of update –––

      No, this only applies to blade lengths of 12 cm and more. Look here:

      Weapons Act (WaffG) Section 42a Ban on carrying pretend weapons and certain portable objects
      (1) It is forbidden
      1. Apparent weapons,
      2. Cutting and thrusting weapons in accordance with Annex 1, Section 1, Subsection 2, No. 1.1 or
      3. Knives with a blade that can be locked with one hand (one-hand knife) or fixed knives with a blade length of more than 12 cm
      respectively.

      The knives I have here only have a blade length of 9 or 10 cm. 12 cm is quite big... I guess the manufacturers are careful not to exceed that.

      • Wolf says:

        Thanks. Didn't know from what length.

      • Marcus says:

        ATTENTION: OR is not equal to AND

        See details here: https://www.die-anwalts-kanzlei.de/einhandmesser-erlaubt-oder-verboten/

        • Jen Kleinholz says:

          Hello Marcus! I have now also read up on other lawyer websites and you are probably right "Knife with a blade that can be locked with one hand (one-hand knife) or fixed knives with a blade length of more than 12 cm".
          So it seems like it doesn't matter how long the blade is. As soon as it is a one-handed knife, where the blade locks, it is forbidden under German law. So the definition of "one-handed jackknife" and "two-handed jackknife" is important. While you can hardly open the Culturo by Wolfgangs with one hand and it definitely falls into the "non-one-handed knife" category (i.e. allowed in Germany!), the Kubey Momentum is advertised as a one-handed knife and therefore not in Germany permitted. I will expressly mention this again at the top of the article so that you do not buy anything that you are not allowed to carry with you. Thank you Marcus!

  3. Lutz S says:

    I have a multi-tool (Leatherman) with me in my backpack on my hikes, and I always have one lying around at home so that it can be used.

    • Jen Kleinholz says:

      That's true, I used to always have a Leatherman with me. The pliers came in handy. But it's heavier and thicker than such a slim little knife.

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