From macOS 14.1: Mac can detect liquid in the USB-C port

what it on the iPhone since 2018 This has now also arrived on the MacBook: liquid detection in physical ports. Because Apple introduced a background process called liquiddetectiond with the update to macOS 14.1. This is intended to monitor whether liquid is entering the USB-C ports of current MacBooks and possibly causing damage. It is still unclear whether there will be a message like on the iPhone in the event of water damage. The assumption is rather that Apple has implemented a tool for device analysis in order to check warranty claims in the event of damage and to prevent fraud.

After updating to macOS 14.1, Mac (with LCI) may detect liquid ingress in USB-C ports. A new background process has been implemented for this purpose. You can find further details here.
After updating to macOS 14.1, Mac (with LCI) may detect liquid ingress in USB-C ports. A new background process has been implemented for this purpose. You can find further details here.

Apple implements liquiddetectiond process in macOS 14.1

If you have already updated your Mac / MacBook to the latest operating system, then you can take a look Activity indicator throw. There you can then look for the new one in the process list or using the search function Daemon with the name liquiddetectiond. By the way, the name stands for “Liquid Detection”. The “d” at the end indicates that this background process is a daemon, i.e. an automatically acting interface between humans and machines. However, if you use a Mac without USB-C ports or not a MacBook (Air / Pro), the process may be missing.

Checked: The process has been running on the 16-inch MacBook Pro with M1 Pro from 2021 since macOS 14.1. So I suspect that it's not just the new M3 MacBooks that have liquid detection sensors (LCI) installed in the USB-C ports.
Checked: The process has been running on the 16-inch MacBook Pro with M1 Pro from 2021 since macOS 14.1. So I suspect that it's not just the new M3 MacBooks that have liquid detection sensors (LCI) installed in the USB-C ports.

You can double-click on the process in the activity display to access further information about it. If you click on the “Analyze” button in the corresponding window, you will see a log with further information. Among other things, it states that the liquid detection process is carried out directly from the launchdprocess is loaded. This is the first daemon that is called by the kernel to start the system and which takes care of numerous system areas as well as the loading of time- and event-related processes and scripts. In short: liquiddetectiond is now a core element of macOS.

Liquid detection on the Mac is intended to help, especially in the Apple Store

It is entirely possible that a warning message is triggered by water damage, condensation in the USB-C port or a plug with residual liquid. There is a warning on the iPhone – sometimes as a bug – “Unable to charge: Liquid has been detected in the Lightning connector“. However, it is believed that the detection and possibly logging of detected liquids in the Thunderbolt port is not really intended for users. Rather, it is intended to be an analysis aid for people in the Apple Store. This would allow them to identify whether the devices submitted are water damaged or actually a warranty case.

"Current Mac laptops and some wired and wireless Apple keyboards are equipped with liquid sensors (LCIs). This makes it possible to determine whether these products have come into contact with liquids“, by the way, it says in Apple’s support document HT201880 (LCI stands for “Liquid Contact Indicator”). It also directly states that liquid damage is not covered by Apple's one-year warranty. This is followed by advertising for AppleCare+, a warranty extension that “unlimited protection against accidental damage“should offer. But exceptions apply here too. Apple points out that you should read the respective terms and conditions.

>>> Water damage on the Mac: We recommend the Sadaghian workshop! <<

My tips & tricks about technology & Apple

Did you like the article and did the instructions on the blog help you? Then I would be happy if you the blog via a Steady Membership would support.

Post a comment

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked with * marked

In the Sir Apfelot Blog you will find advice, instructions and reviews on Apple products such as the iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, AirPods, iMac, Mac Pro, Mac Mini and Mac Studio.

Specials
Shopping
  •  
  •