[Update] Use Mac systems from 1984 to 2000 in the browser (incl. file exchange, apps and games)

Yesterday I stumbled across an online project that I don't want to withhold from you. It's called Infinite Mac and brings you Mac operating systems from 1984 to 2000 directly via the web browser on the computer. Whether you're using a Mac running macOS, a Windows PC, or a Linux machine, you can try out a variety of historic Apple operating systems on the project's website. You can't just click around on the interface. You can also insert or extract files. Apps and even games can also be used. In some systems I have e.g. B. Monkey Island, Warcraft, Photoshop and similar found.

List: Mac OS, OS X and macOS operating systems with name and version number

On the Infinite Mac website you can get an introduction to the project and the emulations of individual operating systems from Mac System 1.0 (1984) to Mac OS 9.0.4 (2000), sorted by year of publication.
On the Infinite Mac website you can get an introduction to the project and the emulations of individual operating systems from Mac System 1.0 (1984) to Mac OS 9.0.4 (2000), sorted by year of publication.

Infinite Mac offers everything from System 1.0 to Mac OS 9.0.4

Various versions and sub-versions of the Mac operating systems from a total of 17 years of Mac development can be found on the website https://infinitemac.org/ look at. You can run some on several different device emulators and even create a network between two emulations. It's really amazing what's possible there.

This extensive and detailed project was brought to life by the developer Mihai Parparita. As for building the project, he states that it used WebAssembly ports from the Mini vMac, Basilisk II, and SheepShaver. These are individual emulators for legacy Mac systems that come together in one place in Infinite Mac.

Here the current "latest" Mac operating system Mac OS 9.0.4 in the emulation. A virtual monitor is displayed on which you can use the individual folders, files, apps, games, menus and network functions.
Here the current "latest" Mac operating system Mac OS 9.0.4 in the emulation. A virtual monitor is displayed on which you can use the individual folders, files, apps, games, menus and network functions.

The linked website of the project and the systems that can be used on it are already very extensive and can be used well for the individual applications. But we are still working on it. At the time this article was published, the following old Apple operating systems, including information on the new system content, were available for testing on the website:

  • System 1.0 (January 1984)
  • System 1.1 (May 1984)
  • System 2.0 (April 1985)
  • System 2.1 (September 1985)
  • System 3.0 (January 1986)
  • System 3.2 (June 1986)
  • System 3.3 (January 1987)
  • System 4.0 (March 1987)
  • System 4.1 (April 1987)
  • System 5.0 (October 1987)
  • System 5.1 (December 1987)
  • System 6.0 (April 1988)
  • System 6.0.2 (September 1988)
  • System 6.0.3 (March 1989)
  • System 6.0.4 (September 1989)
  • System 6.0.5 (March 1990)
  • System 6.0.7 (October 1990)
  • System 6.0.8 (April 1991)
  • System 7 (May 1991)
  • System 7.1 (August 1992)
  • System 7.1.1 (October 1993)
  • System 7.5 (September 1994)
  • System 7.5.1 (March 1995)
  • System 7.5.2 (June 1995)
  • System 7.5.3 (March 1996)
  • System 7.5.3 for PowerPC (March 1996)
  • KanjiTalk 7.5.3 for the Japanese market (March 1996)
  • System 7.5.5 (September 1996)
  • Mac OS 7.6 (January 1997)
  • Mac OS 8.0 (July 1997)
  • Mac OS 8.1 (January 1998)
  • Mac OS 8.5 (October 1998)
  • Mac OS 8.6 (May 1999)
  • Mac OS 9.0 (October 1999)
  • Mac OS 9.0.4 (April 2000)

The individual operating systems are represented in their typical colors, with the typical symbols, the respective menu bar and all other characteristics of the original version. In this way, anyone who has used a Mac before and wants to indulge in nostalgia can relive a few formative computer moments. 

As mentioned above, there is also the possibility of data exchange. In the emulation of Mac OS 9.0.4 there is e.g. B. On the desktop, the directory "The Outside World". Inside there is a "Downloads" folder for files and programs loaded into it, and an "Uploads" folder for things loaded from the system. These are downloaded via the browser in which you run the emulation.

Update: CD-ROM collection and custom emulation

Infinite Mac is constantly being expanded. And so, in June and July 2023, a few features were added for CD-ROM use. While previously it was possible to load your own images of data carriers into the emulations, some suggested data carriers are now easily available on the website - just click and "insert". The library is quite impressive. At the time of this post update (8 August 2023), the following content is available:

  • Apple Developer CD: New Hack City, Other People's Memory, Tool Chest, Inside Macintosh, and more
  • Collections: MacMania 1 through MacMania 6, Power Computing (Disc 1 and 2), Macintosh Demo CDs with apps and games, and more
  • Games: Myst, Riven, Star Wars, The 7th Guest, The Manhole, and more
  • Shops: Inside Mac Games (single issues from 1995 to 1999), MacAddict (three issues)
  • Other: Multimedia content, additional developer tools and reference works

In addition to the new CD-ROM function, the possibility of assembling your own emulation has also been added. To do this, scroll all the way down on the start page and select the custom emulation under the 1999 heading under the Mac OS 9.0 emulation entitled 2023. If you click on "Run", the following settings will be requested before execution:

  • Machine: Mac model from Mac 128k to Power Macintosh G3
  • Disk: Operating systems from System 1.0 to Mac OS 9.0.4
  • Disk URL: Adding a CD-ROM image (.iso or .img) from a supported website
  • Extras: Choose whether to have the "Infinite HD" disk with numerous apps be a part of the emulation

Update end

Videos that explain Infinite Mac in moving images

There are videos from the maker Mihai Parparita as well as from people who are also enthusiastic about this project. These show a few other possible uses. If you're fluent in English, take a look. This is the introductory video of the site operator (unfortunately without audio):

And following the video by Michael MJD, through which I became aware of Infinite Mac yesterday. I can recommend the channel as a whole if you are looking for useful (free) Apps as well as interesting digital projects:

It takes a bit of time to explore

Even if the data for the website is on a modern server, the most up-to-date version of one web browsers uses and even uses a fast computer to call up the emulations, these remain true to the old devices. This means that you have to put up with certain loading times. In addition, an emulation may have dropouts or certain inputs suddenly no longer work. Then you should restart the whole thing. 

Here you can see Mac OS 7.6 with different folders and Microsoft Excel 2.2. What a difference to today's systems, apps and UIs!
Here you can see Mac OS 7.6 with different folders and Microsoft Excel 2.2. What a difference to today's systems, apps and UIs!

But if you take the time, you can do all kinds of things with the individual emulations of the Mac system and the operating systems before “OS X”. From word processing to image editing to games and other programs, there is a lot to discover. By the way, I can recommend that you move the mouse pointer to the bottom edge of the virtual monitor. In addition to the “Done” button, which leads back to the overview of the systems, there is the “Full Screen” option, which allows for even more Immersion the emulated system fills the screen.

What do you think of the project? Please leave a comment!

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7 comments on "[Update] Use Mac systems from 1984 to 2000 in the browser (incl. file exchange, apps and games)"

  1. Hi John,
    My first encounter with Apple was in 1985. It was a MacIntosh. I had just bought an Atari 520 ST from Hertie in Munich. I asked a salesperson if I could try the MacIntosh. I literally spent hours in front of the Apple. Only when my girlfriend at the time stood in front of me in a rage did I stop. Unfortunately, I couldn't afford the MacIntosh at the time. But I also really enjoyed the Atari ST. For professional reasons, it then became a Windows PC. Only with the IPod mini did Apple hardware come back into the house.

    Greetings to you, Jens and the team
    Eyrie

    1. Greetings, Horst! Thanks for your Apple story. 😊 I used to be an Amiga person. No money for a Mac either, but I get the impression there was the Commodore Amiga camp and the Atari ST camp, right?!? 😂

      1. Hi Jens,
        It was a real war then. Honestly one has to say that the Amiga was the better one. I can still remember the game Marble Madness. It appeared first on the Amiga, then on the Atari ST. It was virtually unplayable on the Atari ST. I then bought an additional used Amiga from a work colleague who bought it because of offspring at his wife's request(!). The game was just great for me. Again and again I find myself looking for an Amiga on EBay. So far I can resist the temptation. By the way: Do you still have your Amiga?
        Greetings to you, Johannes and to the team
        Eyrie

      2. Exactly, greetings from the Atari ST camp. My motto was, why do I need a Mac when my ST can do everything? And pitying looks at MS-DOs abound!

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