JIGA GW1 in test: 30.000 mAh power bank with USB-C Power Delivery

JIGA GW1 Powerbank with 30.000 mAh in the test

Power banks are a device category that never ceases to fascinate me. They store an incredible amount of energy in the smallest of spaces and are incredibly practical in everyday life. My fascination with these things is certainly one of the reasons why you can find so many power bank tests on the Sir Apfelot blog.

In this review, I tried a power bank from JIGA, which has a whopping 30.000 mAh. Most large power banks that still have a reasonably handy format usually have no more than 26.800 mAh. That's why the JIGA GW1 with 30.000 mAh is a bit out of the ordinary.

But the JIGA GW1 has another special feature: It has a Lightning input (next to Micro-USB and USB-C) so you can charge them with an iPhone charging cable.

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Here you can see the scope of delivery of the JIGA GW1: power bank, two charging cables and manual (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Here you can see the scope of delivery of the JIGA GW1: power bank, two charging cables and manual (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Transparency notice

JIGA gave me the power bank for free. However, there were no conditions associated with the test. So, as usual, I'll write my test report "open snout" and openly criticize if there's something to criticize. I don't think you would expect anything else, but I still wanted to make it clear that I'm not influenced by just because someone sent me a free product.

Specifications of the JIGA GW1 power bank

  • Manufacturer: JIGA
  • Model: GW1
  • Capacity: 30.000 mAh (measured: 71 Wh)
  • Input USB C PD: 5V / 3A; 9V / 2A; 18W max.
  • Input Micro USB: 5V / 2,4A; 9V / 2A
  • Lightning input: 5V / 2A
  • Qi charging output: 5W, 7,5W, 10W
  • Output USB 1: 5V, 2,1A
  • Output USB 2/3 QC 3.0: 5V / 3A; 9V / 2A; 12V / 1,5A; 18W max.
  • Output USB-C PD: 5V / 3A; 9V / 2A; 12V / 1,5A; 18W max.
  • Load through: no
  • Flashlight function: yes
  • Price: approx. 39 EUR (minus -19% discount at Amazon)

Scope of delivery: power bank, USB-C cable, Micro USB charging cable, manual

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What the JIGA GW1 can do

The technical data says it all, but sometimes it helps if you explain in detail what the abbreviations and values ​​mean.

On the one hand, I find it very advantageous for Apple users that the power bank can be charged both via a USB-C socket and via a Lightning socket - a charging cable that has either one connection or the other is actually always at hand. However, you have to be aware that charging the power bank over USB-C Power Delivery the faster way is - almost twice as fast as Lightning (18 watts instead of 10 watts for Lightning).

The second advantage of the power bank is charging the power bank AND charging devices with USB C Power Delivery. It sounds like the most logical equipment, but there are actually power banks that can quickly charge devices connected via USB-C PD, but only charge at a snail's pace themselves because they don't offer power delivery that way.

The last positive point - besides the impressive capacity - is the variety of connections: Lightning input, USB C in and out, USB with Quick Charge 3.0 for non-iPhone users, Micro-USB - you can hardly ask for more. Quick Charge is a charging standard that is not supported by Apple devices, but Samsung smartphones are compatible with this type of fast charging.

Having lots of ports is definitely an advantage that JIGA power bank has.

Having lots of ports is definitely an advantage that JIGA power bank has.

Oh, and what you shouldn't forget: the power bank even has a built-in Qi charging pad to charge the iPhone or AirPods in particular wirelessly. Not essential, but nice to have.

What the JIGA GW1 Powerbank can't do

There are of course a few applications for which the JIGA Powerbank is out of the question due to the maximum output power of 18 watts. This includes, among other things, charging MacBook models, as these require significantly more than 18 watts.

A 12,9-inch iPad Pro can be charged with the JIGA GW1, but not quickly, because in my test, the iPad Pro consumed more than twice the maximum output power of the power bank when it was plugged into a suitable power supply unit – namely 36 watts.

So I see the JIGA GW1 as a power bank for smartphones, tablets and small devices like AirPods and the like.

My iPhone recognized the power bank directly and started the wireless charging process.

My iPhone recognized the power bank directly and started the wireless charging process.

No load-through feature

Another thing that some might miss about the JIGA Powerbank is "load-through". This means that you can charge devices on the power bank while the power bank itself is also being charged. I tried this and charged my iPad Pro via USB C while charging the JIGA power bank via micro USB.

As soon as the micro-USB connector supplied power to the power bank, the charging power at the USB-C port dropped to 1 watt. That's next to nothing. So you can say that it is practically impossible to charge the power bank and connected devices at the same time.

The JIGA Powerbank has a Qi charging pad on the top, which is activated when you press the button that also queries the battery status.

The JIGA Powerbank has a Qi charging pad on the top, which is activated when you press the button that also queries the battery status.

Design and workmanship of the JIGA GW1 power bank

Power banks are rarely design objects and the JIGA GW1 is no exception. I would say the optics are functional. The case is made of hard plastic and only one ring around the Qi charging pad is rubberized to prevent smartphones from slipping off.

All the sockets are – just like the flashlight – attached to one end of the power bank. If you want to plug in many plugs at the same time, it quickly gets cramped here. In the test, however, I was able to use the USB A and C sockets without them blocking each other.

Ultimately, the power bank makes a solid impression. I wouldn't throw it on the tile floor three times a day, but it should survive a fall without major damage.

The maximum output of the JIGA GW1 is 18 watts. The 12,9-inch iPad Pro would like twice as much, but it charges slowly even at 18 watts.

The maximum output of the JIGA GW1 is 18 watts. The 12,9-inch iPad Pro would like twice as much, but it charges slowly even at 18 watts.

My tests and measurements with the Powerbank GW1

The technical specifications that the manufacturers name are always great, but they often don't have too much to do with reality. That's why I've gotten into the habit of always checking a few things.

In the case of power banks, it is particularly interesting to see whether they really deliver as much charging power as the manufacturer claims and how much capacity you can actually get out of them.

The manufacturer specifies an output power of 18 watts for the charging power. I was also able to measure this with my iPad Pro and got a value of 18,3 watts.

A full charge (here because of the USB multimeter via the USB-A port) consumes 105 watt hours (photos: Sir Apfelot).

A full charge (here because of the USB multimeter via the USB-A port) consumes 105 watt hours (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Efficiency and capacity rather weak

When measuring the "efficiency" I measure the energy that is needed to charge the power bank from 0 to 100% and then see how much energy I get out.

It is quite normal to have a loss of 20 to 30% here, because whenever you charge a battery, some of the energy goes into the environment as heat. Of course there are other aspects that prevent you from achieving 100% efficiency, but I don't have the expertise to report more about them here.

For my measurements, I charged the power bank via the USB-C port with USB C Power Delivery. A total of 105 watt hours (Wh) were fed into the power bank. The charging process took about 7 hours.

When discharging, I was able to draw a total of 71 watt hours, which results in an efficiency of approx. 68%.

When discharging, I was able to draw a total of 71 watt hours, which results in an efficiency of approx. 68%.

When discharging (via a USB load resistor) I was able to draw 71 watt hours from the full power bank. This corresponds to an efficiency of approx. 68%.

measurements:

  • Full charge: approx. 105 Wh (in approx. 7 hours)
  • Completely discharged: approx. 71 Wh
  • Efficiency: 68%

The efficiency is therefore at the lower end of all power banks that I have tried so far. For comparison: The Zendure A8 QC has an efficiency of 81% for me.

The result of this difference is that I can practically get more energy out of the Zendure A8 (84 Wh instead of 71 Wh!) although according to the specifications it has a significantly lower capacity at 26.800 mAh than the JIGA GW1 at 30.000 mAh.

I think the purchase price is also reflected here, because the Zendure A8 also cost over 100 euros at the time, while the JIGA GW1 is less than 40 euros.

Small insert: mAh and Wh - what's the difference?

If you are looking for a smartphone battery, the technical data of a laptop or if you want to buy a high-performance power bank, then you will definitely get past the mAh unit of measurement. This refers to the physical quantity milliampere hour; i.e. the thousandth of the ampere hour (Ah). The specification (admittedly also here in the blog) is often referred to as the "capacity" of the power storage unit, which is not entirely correct, but has become commonplace in everyday language.

Values ​​in Wh (watt hours) are more meaningful for the energy storage capacity and thus with the actual boom in the battery. However, you can use the information in mAh to calculate those sizes if you know the output voltage in volts.

With the JIGA Powerbank, for example, the output voltage of the battery cells used is 3,7 volts. If you offset this 3,7 V with the 30 Ah (= 30.000 mAh) of the mobile power supplier, then you get a value of 3,7 Wh using the equation W=Q*U (30 V * 111 Ah).

The four left LEDs show the battery status and the right LED glows green when wireless charging is activated and a compatible device is attached.

The four left LEDs show the battery status and the right LED glows green when wireless charging is activated and a compatible device is attached.

 

Here you can see the JIGA Powerbank compared to my iPhone 13 Pro Max - the additional battery is a decent package.

Here you can see the JIGA Powerbank compared to my iPhone 13 Pro Max - the additional battery is a decent package.

My conclusion on the JIGA GW1

Despite the poor capacity readings and not-so-high performance, the JIGA GW1 power bank is a cheap solution for people who only want to charge iPads and iPhones and not MacBooks.

I also find it practical for camping because it has an integrated flashlight and combines many connections. If you see yourself as a target group here, you can Check out JIGA GW1 on Amazon.

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If you are more like this target group: "I need performance for MacBook and Co. and I don't care about money!", you can try it Zendure Super Tank Pro look at the power bank. It charges MacBook Pro models with up to 100 watts and you can even park your car on it.

The JIGA power bank also has a built-in LED, which can be used as a flashlight in an emergency.

The JIGA power bank also has a built-in LED, which can be used as a flashlight in an emergency.

JIGA GW1 manual

For everyone who is looking for the operating instructions for the JIGA GW1 Powerbank, I have made a small photo collage here:

Here is the user manual for the JIGA GW1 Powerbank - unfortunately only pieced together from bad photos.

Here is the user manual for the JIGA GW1 Powerbank - unfortunately only pieced together from bad photos.

 

The specifications of the additional battery are printed on the back of the JIGA Powerbank.

The specifications of the additional battery are printed on the back of the JIGA Powerbank.

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The page contains affiliate links / images: Amazon.de

2 comments

  1. Thomas says:

    Thanks for the test, but the part is already a fat hum.

    • Jen Kleinholz says:

      Yes, anything in the 26800mAh range and up is pretty thick. The 10.000 mAh batteries are still reasonably handy. After that it goes steeply downhill. 😂

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