Leitz metal stapler - my pick of the week in week 19

Leitz stapler made of metal

I rarely buy new office equipment, such as hole punches, staplers and the like. In the entire 22 years that I've been self-employed, I've only bought a new stapler twice. My last one was a Leitz plastic stapler.

Actually, these things are relatively robust, but on my old model the plastic base has dissolved and no longer holds. I managed to repair it with adhesive tape for two weeks, but then it got to the point where it didn't last either.

The Leitz stapler is made entirely of metal and robust enough to drive nails into (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

The Leitz stapler is made entirely of metal and robust enough to drive nails into (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

Leitz stapler made of metal - indestructible stapler

When looking for a new device, I deliberately focused on models that are made entirely of metal. I just didn't want to run the risk of some plastic part dissolving into thin air and the whole stapler having to be thrown away.

I finally found what I was looking for at the Stapling pliers 55490081 from Leitzwhich works with standard staples P3 (24/6, 26/6) and P4 (24/8). A changeover from open to closed stapling is possible because the anvil can be rotated.

If you turn the anvil of the stapler, instead of closed stapling, you can also achieve open stapling, which can be removed more easily from the paper.

If you turn the anvil of the stapler, instead of closed stapling, you can also achieve open stapling, which can be removed more easily from the paper.

 

Here you can see the open stitching on the left and the closed stitching on the right.

Here you can see the open stitching on the left and the closed stitching on the right.

Incidentally, the stapler can handle up to 40 sheets, which my old stapler would only have packed with the thinnest of greaseproof paper. If you hold the stapling pliers in your hand, you immediately know that the 40 sheets are not a marketing lie, because the thing is heavy (approx. 400 g) and gives you the feeling that it is extremely robust.

Metal stapler with compound sheet technology

A special feature that immediately fascinated me with the Leitz stapling pliers is the built-in technology, because unlike my last stapler, you don't have to use a lot of force even for thick stacks of paper.

On the one hand, this is because of the large lever that the size has, but on the other hand, the power transmission is not linear. It reminds me of that Compound bows, which are built in such a way that you use the most force at the beginning via a roller or lever system and then it does not get more and more difficult, as with a normal bow, but lighter.

It is similar with these stapling pliers - even if there are certainly no rollers inside: You staple with them and have the feeling that you have to use relatively little force at the time of "stapling". I suppose that is also achieved through leverage.

This spring is used to push the staples into the stapler from behind. In fact, there is a small plastic part there, but I replace that with a paper clip if it should make the flutter.

This spring is used to push the staples into the stapler from behind. In fact, there is a small plastic part there, but I replace that with a paper clip if it should make the flutter.

My conclusion: a stapler that will last forever

After using the stapling pliers for a few weeks now, I get the feeling that I probably won't have to get a new stapler in this life. The metal construction is very durable and if the plastic cucumbers last almost a decade, then this stapler should easily last 20 to 30 years - if one of my children doesn't poke it.

Do you need a new stapler? Check out those Leitz stapling pliers (Model number: 55490081) at times.

Do you have great office technology that inspires you? Then please leave a comment. Maybe they'll make it into ours too Picks of the week.

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7 comments

  1. Minimilianus says:

    Curious that we are talking about this device. Two reasons were decisive for my purchase: Leitz and Metall. When the thing stopped working properly after a while, I couldn't find an explanation for it. With plastic, I would have said it warped. Maybe it was in the sun. But with metal? The fact that I had to buy these stapling pliers, which we use quite often, several times, is not so important. Much more important was that no one had an explanation for the fact that at some point the staple to be processed did not come out of the magazine exactly at the designated places on the anvil and consequently no longer stapled. Very "paranormal" the whole thing. I would be very grateful for any normal explanation.

    • Jen Kleinholz says:

      Hi Minimilianus! Unfortunately, you can't look inside the thing ... it's all riveted and not screwed. But if you have a broken copy, you could drill open the rivets and take a look. I haven't had a breakdown yet, but I've only been using the stapler for a few weeks.

  2. Thomas says:

    Best tacker! The service is also right at Leitz. I once lost the tension spring. Leitz sent me a new one free of charge.

  3. Tina says:

    I think the staple pliers are great too, I even wanted them for my birthday. :) However, I can't get the anvil turned. how does this work please Thanks in advance!

    • Jen Kleinholz says:

      The anvil is pulled down with me with a spring. To rotate it I just have to pull it up (which is very easy with the weak spring) and then you can rotate and release it. Could it be that he's stuck with you? I don't have a lock or anything like that...

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