Mac: turn off automatic capitalization + productivity tip

Disable automatic capitalization on the Mac

Today we're talking about a feature of macOS that has been annoying people for years and that has been switched off for over a year because I was fed up at some point. It's about automatic capitalization, which the Mac does whenever you don't need it.

Classic example: You start an email in Apple Mail with the words "Hello XYZ," and then continue to write in the line below with "attached the PDF for". And what does the Mac do? He thinks, "Oh, there's a word at the beginning of the line! I'll quickly capitalize that." The "attached" becomes an "attached", which is of course total nonsense, because we had a comma at the top of the salutation.

If the Mac automatically capitalizes words that it should keep lowercase, then here is the solution.

If the Mac automatically capitalizes words that it should keep lowercase, then here is the solution.

Switch off automatic capitalization in the system settings

The good news is that the Mac can be weaned off of this nonsense. To do this, proceed as follows:

  1. System Settings
  2. Keyboard
  3. Select the "Text" submenu
  4. Remove the check mark next to "Automatically capitalize words"

With this you also have the "disadvantage" that in future lower case letters will no longer be corrected after a point, but I am happy to accept that. If my mistakes persist, I find it much less annoying than if you write something correctly three times a day and the Mac then "corrects" it incorrectly.

Here you can see which option you should deactivate in order to switch off the automatic capitalization in Apple Mail and other programs.

Here you can see which option you should deactivate in order to switch off the automatic capitalization in Apple Mail and other programs.

Productivity tip: handy text replacements in the same control panel

If you are already in the system settings for the keyboard in the "Text" area, you can also set up another feature there: automatic text replacement. The way it works is that you define a certain string and then specify what it should be replaced by. I have realized a few practical things that I would like to give you here as an example:

  • @@ becomes my e-mail address (very useful because I have to type this in a lot when registering on any website.)
  • @tel is converted to my phone number
  • @iban is converted into my IBAN account number (I can never remember it)
  • @bic is replaced by the BIC number
  • @ust will be replaced by my sales tax identification number
  • @schatz is replaced with the name of the current woman (haha, just kidding!)
  • etc.

You already notice: You can really use this function quite wildly, but of course you have to remember all the abbreviations, because otherwise the whole thing does not help. Unfortunately, a small limitation of the native text replacement is that it cannot output multi-line items. So you are not able to save a signature with several lines as an abbreviation. Text with formatting and images cannot be realized with it either.

If you are looking for a tool that can do this and much more, take a look Text expander on. I've been using it for ages, then because of the subscription model it was free atext Hiked, but ended up back at Text Expander, because atext sometimes replaces abbreviations incorrectly, which is quite annoying in everyday life. I will soon write a more extensive article about atext and text expander, because both tools are pretty exciting.

 

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2 comments

  1. Thomas says:

    I now use LanguageTool for this and I am more than satisfied with this tool.

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