macOS 13 Mammoth - This is what the next but one Mac operating system could look like

With macOS 12 Monterey, Apple is releasing a new operating system for Mac, iMac, MacBook, Mac mini, Mac Pro and Co. this fall. But even before that happens, ideas for publication next year come up. What could macOS 13 Mammoth look like? How does it become more modern and easier to use? Which elements from iOS or iPadOS should be adopted? Parker Ortolani tried to answer these and other questions at 9to5Mac. He deals with the desktop, the menu bar and its control center, the dock, widgets, Siri and Spotlight. The result is a concept for macOS Mammoth that we can expect in autumn 2022.

TL; DR: Here is the original concept

macOS Mammoth is said to be the Mac operating system that will be rolled out in autumn 2022. What it could look like was shown at 9to5Mac. Here you see z. B. Widgets on the Mac desktop and a split, dynamic menu bar at the top of the screen.

macOS Mammoth is said to be the Mac operating system that will be rolled out in autumn 2022. What it could look like was shown at 9to5Mac. Here you see z. B. Widgets on the Mac desktop and a split, dynamic menu bar at the top of the screen.

Apple macOS Mammoth as the idea of ​​9to5Mac

According to Apple magazine, the Mac operating system, which is expected for fall 2022, could introduce a completely new desktop design. Among other things, widgets that can be freely arranged on the desk are desired here. The menu bar no longer continuously covers the upper edge of the screen, but consists of two rounded parts: the menu of the open app or the system on the left, and the control center with date, clock and Co. on the right. 

The dock should offer an app library and a widget overview; also app folders instead of just individual app symbols. The Spotlight search is desired with a microphone button for Siri inquiries as well as directly displayed Siri suggestions when calling up the search function. So similar to both Search function on the iPhone. With Scribble, the possibility is required to bring handwritten entries via the trackpad to the Mac and to use them in the system. 

Why the name "Mammoth" for the operating system?

As stated in the source linked above, 9to5Mac discovered that Apple was ahead of the Introducing macOS 12 Monterey has had the two names Monterey and Mammoth renewed as trademarks. Therefore, it is believed that the second name will be that of macOS 13. Both are based on macOS 11 Big Sur and are intended to bring the systems of Mac, iPad and iPhone closer together. This is reflected in the design and functional decisions made by Apple, but also in the ideas of 9to5Mac. 

But let's stay with the name for a moment. This is once again a region in the nature of California. Since Mac OS X 10.9 Mavericks this has been used again and again for names. Then came Yosemite, El Capitan, Sierra, High Sierra, Mojave, Catalina, Big Sur and Monterey. According to the source, the Mammoth region with the lakes of the same name, a mountain and also a city is in close proximity to all of these eponymous regions and sights. The name is logical as well as geographically close.

The app library could (and should, according to 9to5Mac) replace the launchpad. There should also be a fixed widget icon on the right side of the dock.

The app library could (and should, according to 9to5Mac) replace the launchpad. There should also be a fixed widget icon on the right side of the dock.

The “macOS Mammoth” concept at a glance

In the following I will briefly summarize the macOS concept described in detail in the English source in German. If you want additional information as well as further pictures in addition to the list, then click on the link to the article by Parker Ortolani under the introduction. There are also GIFs that represent a use of the macOS Mammoth concept.

Desk

  • Dynamic menu bar, the width of which adjusts depending on the app
  • Control center, which also includes menu bar icons from third-party apps
  • Widgets shouldn't perish in the message center, but should be able to be placed on the desk

Dock

  • App folder to combine several apps and to save space
  • App library like on mobile devices should replace the launchpad
  • The widget overview is intended to replace the dashboard that was removed a few years ago

control center

  • New controls to quickly and easily unlock / lock the camera and microphone
  • Moving the menu bar icons of third-party apps to the control center (drag & drop)

Widgets

  • Should be freely placeable on the desk
  • Hide and show with one click
  • Pin them to appear over active app windows
  • Move back and forth between desks using Mission Control

Spotlight

  • Siri button for inquiries via the microphone
  • Siri suggestions under the search bar, like on iOS and iPadOS

Scribble

  • Handwritten entries on the Mac using the trackpad
  • Display of the trackpad input via native visualization

App window

  • Reduced adjustment elements (red, yellow and green points) that become larger when hovering with the mouse cursor
  • When hovering over the green point, the adjustment options for the window are displayed
You can certainly criticize the macOS 13 Mammoth concept (see below), but the desk widgets and the adjustments in the dock somehow make sense.

You can certainly criticize the macOS 13 Mammoth concept (see below), but the desk widgets and the adjustments in the dock somehow make sense.

Criticism of the concept of 9to5Mac

In the comments of the 9to5Mac article, there is not only encouragement, but also justified criticism. In particular, nobody wants to see the window buttons for closing, minimizing and maximizing / split view as miniatures that expand when you hover over them with the mouse. This will quickly lead to wrong clicks and frustration because you clicked something wrong. In addition, it is actually just a visual gimmick with no real functional added value. 

But the dynamic menu bar is also contradicted in a comprehensive comment. It shows that the proposed design disregards important principles for UI design. Mainly that control elements should not change in shape or size (during use). In an operating system in particular, the elements should not change so dynamically, so that the operation remains easier (clearer for beginners, offering a workflow for advanced users). 

I fully understand the points of criticism from the comments. how do you see it? What do you like about the concept and what don't? Feel free to leave a comment with your opinion and your wishes for future macOS versions :)

Is my Mac compatible with macOS Monterey?

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2 comments

  1. Bodo Schönfelder says:

    I hope the design will not be implemented. Designers who have no idea of ​​the everyday practice of average users let off steam

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