OneOdio Monitor 60 review: wired studio headphones put to the test

OneOdio Monitor 60 review

Balanced mid-tones, crystal-clear highs and a deep, intense Hi-Res sound profile are characteristics that OneOdio uses to advertise its "OneOdio Monitor 60" over-ear headphones. I would like to clarify how much truth there is in these promises in the test report. OneOdio provided me with the headphones free of charge, but there is no influence on the report.

1,58 EUR
OneOdio Headphones with cable, Monitor 60 Professional closed studio headphones 38 Ohm,...
  • HI-RES AUDIO: Balanced tone mids, crystal clear highs with 50mm audio drivers for deep, intense Hi-Res ...
  • PERFECT FOR STUDIO: Professional studio headphones for monitoring and recording in a compact over-ear design that...
  • ADAPTER FREE: Monitor 60 dj headset includes a 1.2m cable with microphone for telephone calls, a 3.5mm to ...
The OneOdio Monitor 60 over-ear headphones tested by Sir Apfelot.

The OneOdio Monitor 60 over-ear headphones tested by Sir Apfelot.

Specifications for the OneOdio Monitor 60

Before we get to my actual review, I would like to briefly present the technical specifications of the headphones:

  • Manufacturer: OneOdio
  • Model: Monitor 60
  • Type: Circumaural / Over-Ear Headphones
  • Application: DJ headphones, mastering, studio, monitoring, broadcast, mixing, tracking, personal listening
  • Headphone connection: 3,5 mm jack
  • Headset function: yes, through the included cable with built-in microphone
  • Audio driver: 50 mm
  • Sensitivity: 110dB±3dB
  • Impedance: 38Ω
  • Frequency range: 20Hz-40KHz
  • Weight: 310g
  • Max. input power: 1600mW at 1KHz
  • Pivoting ear cups: 90° both directions
  • Earmuffs: 3 cm thick protein leather memory foam (open area inside for the ears approx. 60 mm diameter)
  • ANC: no
  • Bluetooth: no
  • Price: approx. 75 EUR (The Amazon)
The package of the OneOdio studio headphones looks quite noble and the content does not disappoint - neither does the sound, but more on that below.

The package of the OneOdio studio headphones looks quite noble and the content does not disappoint - neither does the sound, but more on that below.

 

In this photo you can see the complete scope of delivery of the OneOdio Monitor 60 - only the manual is missing from the picture.

In this photo you can see the complete scope of delivery of the OneOdio Monitor 60 - only the manual is missing from the picture.

In addition to the headphones themselves, the scope of delivery of the headphones also includes a transport bag (no hard case), a manual and three cables so that you can do without an adapter:

  • Cable 3,5 mm to 3,5 mm jack with a length of 3 meters
  • Spiral cable 3,5 mm to 6,35 mm jack with a length of 1,5 to 3,0 meters
  • Cable with microphone from 3,5 mm to 3,5 mm jack with a length of 1,2 meters
Also included is a cable that has a built-in microphone. This means that the OneOdio headphones can also be used as a headset.

Also included is a cable that has a built-in microphone. This means that the OneOdio headphones can also be used as a headset.

Manufacturing quality and optics

With studio headphones under 100 euros, you shouldn't expect miracles from the materials. Accordingly, one could also call the OneOdio Monitor 60 “plastic bombers”, because apart from the headband, which has an aluminum core, the headphones are mainly made of plastic.

From my point of view, this is not tragic, because the manufacturing quality still seems to me to be quite good. The headphones are well made and don't feel particularly rickety or filigree, despite the plastic. Ok, with my Apple AirPods Max I would knock out a burglar without hesitation, which would probably end well for the burglar with the OneOdio Monitor 60, but comparing these two headphone models in terms of workmanship is also a bit unfair. The OneOdio Monitor 60 costs around 75 euros and the Apple AirPods Max still cost well over 400 euros even in a price comparison.

In my opinion, the OneOdio Monitor 60 has nothing to complain about in terms of workmanship. Only the jack socket, which is on the headphones for the 3,5 mm cable, seems to me to be a custom-made product, as it has a flattened side with a small ball. That could be a problem if the included cable ever breaks, as I don't know if OneOdio offers these individually. Unfortunately, I couldn't find anything suitable on Amazon.

Here you can see the special connection that OneOdio has built in for the headphones. I can't say whether that's a good idea. When replacing the cable, you probably have to rely on OneOdio (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Here you can see the special connection that OneOdio has built in for the headphones. I can't say whether that's a good idea. When replacing the cable, you probably have to rely on OneOdio (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Ear pad cover: Artificial protein leather - unfortunately not vegan

By the way, the material with which the ear cushions are covered is so-called protein leather. That sounded like something vegan to me at first, but from what I've read, it's some kind of faux leather with real leather powder added to it to make it more leather-like.

I would have liked companies to gradually stop using such animal ingredients. It's easy to make a decent fabric cover or just use faux leather without any admixture. The vegans among us would be happy if headphones could one day do without leather.

The ear pads of the OneOdio Monitor 60 are extremely thick and soft. They not only ensure a comfortable seat, but also filter out a lot of background noise from the outside.

The ear pads of the OneOdio Monitor 60 are extremely thick and soft. They not only ensure a comfortable seat, but also filter out a lot of background noise from the outside.

Comfort and room for the ears

These are two points that are very important to me when it comes to over-ear headphones - in addition to the sound, of course. And that's where the OneOdio Monitor 60 really are in the "very convenient" category. The ear pads are actually large enough to enclose the ears and are so thick and soft that nothing pinches or feels uncomfortable here.

The headband can be adjusted several times and is also well padded. Once locked into position, it also doesn't shift as quickly as many other headphones.

The hinges on the ear cups allow the ear cups to be rotated 90 degrees in any direction. The processing quality seems to me to be quite robust - despite the use of plastic.

The hinges on the ear cups allow the ear cups to be rotated 90 degrees in any direction. The processing quality seems to me to be quite robust - despite the use of plastic.

Noise cancellation without electronic ANC

One thing I also noticed positively: the ear pads are quite thick and the headphones have a closed design. This ensures that noise from the outside is greatly reduced. The construction noticeably filters out particularly annoying high tones even without electronics.

When I was listening to music, my wife came over and wanted to talk to me, but I could hardly understand her, which usually only happens with my active noise-cancelling (ANC) headphones.

On the left are the AKG K240 MK II and on the right the OneOdio Monitor 60 - sound-wise they are quite similar, but the OneOdio headphones offer a bit more bass power.

On the left are the AKG K240 MK II and on the right the OneOdio Monitor 60 - sound-wise they are quite similar, but the OneOdio headphones offer a bit more bass power.

The sound in comparison: OneOdio Monitor 60 vs. AKG K 240 MK II

The only headphones in my collection that will pass for studio headphones are my AKG K240 MK II (here is my review of this). These are also over-ear headphones, but with an open design. Despite this difference, a comparison in terms of sound makes sense to me, because the AKG K240 MK II are currently for about 60 euros at Idealo to get.

I obviously don't have the hearing of a sound engineer trained to interpret audio, but I feel the OneOdio Monitor 60 does a good job. As you would expect from studio headphones, the mids and highs are not ironed out, as is the case with some other headphones that are trimmed in the sound spectrum more towards "modern music" with a lot of bass.

Nevertheless, the basses of the OneOdio Monitor 60 are nice and dry and clear and the trebles are not annoyingly shrill. So the sound is pleasantly balanced.

There is an audible difference compared to the AKG, but I can't say that one is better or worse. Both sound very balanced, which is how studio headphones should be. Only in the bass range is the AKG perhaps a little weaker than the OneOdio.

From my point of view, the sound of the OneOdio Monitor 60 is very pleasant. When listening, you can clearly separate different instruments and vocals from each other and the basses are not an exaggerated boom, but are clear, distinct and not muddy.

On the left the OneOdio Monitor 60 and on the right the Apple AirPods Max - and yes: the OneOdio headphones are really that big and cuddly.

On the left the OneOdio Monitor 60 and on the right the Apple AirPods Max - and yes: the OneOdio headphones are really that big and cuddly.

OneOdio Monitor 60 vs Apple AirPods Max

I had already indicated that the two headphones should not actually be compared due to the large price difference. I'll do it anyway because maybe some of you own the AirPods Max and a comparison makes sense for that reason.

If you listen to a few songs with both speakers and quickly switch back and forth, you will notice that the OneOdio Monitor 60's resolution is less clear. From my point of view, the AirPods Max deliver an even clearer sound image, in which all the details of the music can be heard. However, that was also heard from audiophile testers of the AirPods Max. They seem really insanely good.

But that sounds like the OneOdio Monitor 60 are no good. But that's not the case considering the price range. They could potentially break down more in the midrange, but I'd call that whining at a high level.

To connect the OneOdio Monitor 60 to an iPhone, you need a Lightning to Aux adapter. And the best one I could find so far is the original one from Apple.

To connect the OneOdio Monitor 60 to an iPhone, you need a Lightning to Aux adapter. And the best one I could find so far is the original one from Apple.

Can the OneOdio Monitor 60 be operated on the iPhone?

Yes you can. That's exactly how I tried it too. Since the iPhone models have not had a jack output for a while, you have to use one Lightning to Aux Adapter set to connect the headphones to the iPhone.

After many mistakes with these adapters, I have come to the conclusion that the small Apple adapter (here at Amazon) is the only one that actually does its job for years and does not eventually acknowledge its service with the message "Accessory is not compatible".

There are a few reviews on Amazon complaining about the poor sound from the headphones as they sound totally weak. I'm concerned that these people may have trouble connecting their smartphone properly and the headphones will not get enough power as a result. I can promise you if you use the Apple adapter it sounds decent.

By the way: If you want to connect such wired headphones to your iPad with a USB-C port, you should get the original Apple USB-C to 3,5 mm jack adapter (here at Amazon).

Thanks to the joints, the OneOdio headphones can be folded up to save space.

Thanks to the joints, the OneOdio headphones can be folded up to save space.

Suitable for DJs? With restrictions…

The OneOdio Monitor 60 is also advertised as DJ headphones. However, I see a small criticism here, because DJs like to fold down an ear cup so that they can hear what's playing in one ear and what's coming out of the headphones in the other. This is also possible with the OneOdio Monitor 60, but the back of the auricle is not padded and therefore quite uncomfortable if you clamp it twisted to your head.

It would probably be better here if OneOdio had planned a corresponding back on the ear cups so that you can wear them upside down on your ear or on your head for a while. However, I'm not a DJ and can't really say if that's a problem in practice. It's just a thought I had while looking at the ear cups.

1,58 EUR
OneOdio Headphones with cable, Monitor 60 Professional closed studio headphones 38 Ohm,...
  • HI-RES AUDIO: Balanced tone mids, crystal clear highs with 50mm audio drivers for deep, intense Hi-Res ...
  • PERFECT FOR STUDIO: Professional studio headphones for monitoring and recording in a compact over-ear design that...
  • ADAPTER FREE: Monitor 60 dj headset includes a 1.2m cable with microphone for telephone calls, a 3.5mm to ...

OneOdio Monitor 60 – a recommendation, isn't it?

I think if you are looking for a wired headphone that has a decent sound, that is comfortable to wear, that reduces a lot of noise from outside thanks to its padding and that is quite well made, you will be happy with the OneOdio Monitor 60 .

To me, the OneOdio Monitor 60 sounds like headphones that you can use as everyday headphones even without a studio. If you like, you can have it yourself look here at Amazon.

OneOdio Monitor 60 Manual and User Guide

Just in case someone is looking for the user manual for the OneOdio Monitor 60, I took a photo of it and included it here as an image:

OneOdio Monitor 60 User Manual

Also included is a cable that has a built-in microphone. This means that the OneOdio headphones can also be used as a headset.

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3 comments

  1. Oliver Mengedoht says:

    “…it's a kind of faux leather that has real leather powder added to it to make it more leather-like.
    I would have liked companies to gradually move away from using such animal ingredients.”
    Well, I would wish that leather was used and not plastic/artificial leather, which is much more comfortable on the ear and there really is enough plastic. Something regrowable might not be so bad (and definitely the most comfortable and least sweaty on the ear).

    Nice job, Ollie

    • Jen Kleinholz says:

      Sure, it's a matter of taste. I could imagine that it gets quite sweaty under the ear pads in summer. There is another OneOdio model with velor fabric... that's the best I can imagine.

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