Optimage - The Mac tool for compressing PNG and JPG images

The Optimage tool is a Mac app for image optimization and compression of image files.

Since I count down practically every photo in my blog, a long time ago I read through various tests on programs that specialize in compressing images for websites. I use so far TinyPNG or TinyJPG, because the manufacturer offers a WordPress plug-in and a Photoshop plug-in in addition to an online service, so that photos can be saved optimally compressed directly from Photoshop. The "Save for Web" function built into Photoshop also delivers a JPEG, but unfortunately these are not particularly small in terms of file size, so I only ever used TinyPNG / TinyJPG.

Risk of confusion: Optimage and ImageOptim

Short inset: The following is about "Optimage" and "ImageOptim" - both tools that unfortunately have a very similar name. This post here is mainly dedicated to Optimage, as I didn't know this image optimizer yet and have therefore tested it with various competitors.

The Optimage tool is a Mac app for image optimization and compression of image files.

The Optimage tool is a Mac app for image optimization and compression of image files.

Often and well tested: ImageOptim

The tool ImageOptim is an image reducer that performed better than TinyPNG in most tests, Short pixels, Imagify.io and other tools supplied. In my tests, however, he was unable to improve the photos that I had previously compressed with TinyPNG / JPG (when I activated "lossless"). The list always showed 0% for optimization. Still, ImageOptim is a recommendation for anyone looking for free Mac software to compress image files. ImageOptim offers a lot of setting options and also knows how to optimize nested folders with many photos using drag and drop.

Imageoptim also offers a paid web service, which can be used to compress large amounts of photos by their server.

Imageoptim also offers a paid web service, which can be used to compress large amounts of photos by their server.

Optimage: new star in the compression sky?

Today, in a blog post about optimizing images for Google search, I found the reference to a compression tool that I was previously unfamiliar with: Optimage. Since I am interested in the performance of such software, I have a bunch of photos from my post about my last ride on the electric unicycle thrown in Optimage and looked what he could get out of it. In fact, some of the photos have become noticeably smaller. But some don't either ...

I have put together a table for you with the improvements and the corresponding percentage so that you can see how well the program is working. And it has to be noted here that TinyJPG has already done a good job. So the bar was pretty high!

Image fileBefore (TinyJPG)After (Optimage)Improvement of
ks18l-exit-map.jpg306 KB306 KB0%
ks18l-foto-departure.jpg185 KB185 KB0%
ks18l-foto-ankunft.jpg234 KB234 KB0%
ks18l-foto-dirtfaenger.jpg223 KB206 KB7,6%
ks18l-hochsitz.jpg115 KB72 KB37%
ks18l-nachtfahrt.jpg108 KB62 KB42%
ks18l-schlammpfuetze.jpg434 KB387 KB11%
ks18l-fall.jpg318 KB257 KB19%

In the table you can see that not all images could be compressed better. I have the feeling that these photos in particular, which have large dark or monochrome areas, could be made smaller by Optimage. The software had to fit with many photos. TinyJPG has already done good preparatory work.

Test photo 1 for the compression test. In comparison: Photoshop JPEG storage, TinyJPG and Optimage (Photo: Sir Apfelot).

Test photo 1 for the compression test. In comparison: Photoshop JPEG storage, TinyJPG and Optimage (Photo: Sir Apfelot).

Test compared to the Photoshop function, HEIC and TinyJPG

To see what the Mac app Optimage can get out of a photo compared to Photoshop's "Save for Web" function, I downloaded the original size photo shown above from the iPhone XS. The following values ​​came out:

  • File size in HEIC format: 2,2 MB
  • Photoshop Save for Web: 1,4MB
  • Photoshop "Save as JPG (high quality)": 1,0 MB
  • TinyJPG: 410 KB (took 1:16 m: s!)
  • Optimage: 1,2 MB (took only 9 s)

In this case, TinyJPG performed significantly better than Optimage. Even if I calculate the image to a height of 1200 pixels and save it with TinyJPG, Optimage can no longer optimize anything (0%).

Optimage test photo 2: Here, too, TinyJPG delivers the smaller file.

Optimage test photo 2: Here, too, TinyJPG delivers the smaller file. For the article I have scaled the photo down to a smaller resolution. The image optimization programs had to work with the full resolution.

Optimage cannot score with these photos either:

  • File size in HEIC format: 3,0 MB
  • TinyJPG: 1,1 MB (took 1:15 m: s!)
  • Optimage: 2,0 MB (took only 8 s)

As you can see, as with most other tools, it all depends on the source material. If you have large areas of the same color in the picture, one seems to be better, while the other can score with gradients or other special features.

Optimage and TinyJPG in comparison - Attention: This photo is of course compressed again and cannot be used as a comparison! I had done the comparison in 100% view in the preview app on the Mac.

Optimage and TinyJPG in comparison - Attention: This photo is of course compressed again and cannot be used as a comparison! I had done the comparison in 100% view in the preview app on the Mac.

Visible differences between TinyJPG and Optimage?

Since the file sizes were so different for the two tools, I looked at a test photo in detail and tried to find any visible differences. Even after several minutes of visual inspection at 100%, I couldn't find any areas that were noticeably different. There were no visible JPG compressions or anything like that. In this direction, one cannot therefore search for the difference in the file size of the output files.

By the way, my picture embedded here with the two comparison photos is only for decorative purposes. It is clear to me that you cannot make a serious comparison of photos if you compress this comparison image with the two images with TinyJPG and incorporate it into the blog as a JPG. : D

What Optimage can and cannot do ...

I have to say that I find the Photoshop plugin from TinyJPG or TinyPNG extremely useful, because I edit all my photos for the blog posts in Photoshop first and then optimize them and save them with the plugin. I dare to doubt whether this possibility is important for everyone, but I would like to say it nonetheless. For this reason, here is a list of points that Optimage CANNOT offer:

  • there is no Photoshop plugin
  • there is no web service or API interface
  • there is no WordPress plugin
  • it doesn’t offer as many setting options as ImageOptim

What it can or offers:

  • It can work with nested folders and optimize the photos in the structure. This is helpful if, for example, you want to run through the "uploads" folder of your WordPress installation in one go.
  • It can handle the HEIC format of Apple photos.
  • There is a possibility to use the Mac app for free if you want to reduce a maximum of 24 image files per day.
The interface of Optimage is simple: Drag and drop one or more photos onto the window and click the button. The originals will be replaced by the optimized versions.

The interface of Optimage is simple: Drag and drop one or more photos onto the window and click the button. The originals will be replaced by the optimized versions.

My conclusion on Optimage

Regardless of whether you use Imageoptim, Optimage or TinyPNG: none of the three candidates are bad, but it is difficult to choose a winner here. If you throw 20 photos into all tools, one of the tools does not always have the best results for all. Optimage offers a free version where you can count down up to 24 photos per day. If you want to convert more, you have to put 15 USD / EUR on the counter once to buy the software. In my opinion, as a Mac app, I somehow like the ImageOptim solution better, as it has many setting options with which you can not only influence the quality of the output files but also the file sizes.

My procedure for the future will be that I continue to back up my photos from Photoshop with the plugin from TinyJPG. So far TinyJPG has delivered very well compressed photos and only in a few cases has Optimage been able to improve the file size again. I can live with this compromise.

-
Do you like my blog? Then I would be happy to receive a short review on Google. Easy leave something here for a moment - that would be great, thank you!

 

Effectively for free: iPhone 13 Mini and iPhone 13 deals with top conditions at Otelo - Advertisement

Leave a Comment

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked with * .