In the test: Satechi M1 Bluetooth mouse with USB-C charging socket

One can argue about taste: I personally don't like the look with the color-separated surfaces. But there are sure to be people who find exactly this beautiful.

After recently doing the Satechi Slim Wireless Keyword in the test, it continues today with a Bluetooth mouse from Satechi. There really isn't that much to test with mice, but my hand has been used to the flat Magic Mouse from Apple for years, so I quickly get pain in the back of the hand with many "bulky" computer mice. Most mice now feel too bulged for me, even though I only worked with mice like this in the past. I was curious for the reason how the wireless Satechi M1 in my test beats.

The Satechi M1 Wireless Mouse is a Bluetooth mouse with a USB-C charging port (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

The Satechi M1 Wireless Mouse is a Bluetooth mouse with a USB-C charging port (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

Transparency notice

The Satechi M1 was made available to me free of charge for the test. Satechi had no influence on my judgment and could not influence the report in any other way.

Technical data

The technical specifications of the mouse are quickly clarified:

  • Model: ST-ABTCM
  • Dimensions: 11,2 5,9 x x 3,0 cm
  • Bluetooth 4.0
  • Weight: 86,5 grams
  • Sensor: optical
  • Resolution: 1200 dpi
  • Battery capacity: 500 mAh
  • Charging socket: USB-C
  • Equipment: Left and right mouse button plus scroll wheel (also clickable!)
The Satechi Bluetooth mouse comes with a USB-A to USB-C charging cable.

The Satechi Bluetooth mouse comes with a USB-A to USB-C charging cable.

Design and ergonomics

The optics didn't appeal to me at first. I like the simple design of my Apple Magic Mouse. The Satechi M1 has a color-contrasting ellipse in which the mouse buttons are hidden. The scroll wheel, in turn, has an aluminum look that matches the rest of the mouse's housing. Personally, I would have preferred a monochrome design, but tastes are different. I think there are sure to be a lot of people who like this design too.

One can argue about taste: I personally don't like the look with the color-separated surfaces. But there are sure to be people who find exactly this beautiful.

One can argue about taste: I personally don't like the look with the color-separated surfaces. But there are sure to be people who find exactly this beautiful.

Satechi has also taken up the current colors from Apple and offers the mouse in Gold, rose gold, Silver and Space gray.

In terms of weight, the mouse is relatively light in the hand. The mouse buttons can be operated without any effort and the scroll wheel also works perfectly and has a grid that allows you to accurately select a specific entry in scrollable lists on the screen.

In addition to its actual function, the scroll wheel can also be used as a middle mouse button. Since macOS does not offer the option of assigning a function to this mouse button by default, you should consider this BetterTouchTool install (is also in Setapp subscription contain). With this software you can assign any action to the clickable scroll wheel of the Satechi mouse.

With the BetterToucTool, all buttons of a Bluetooth mouse can be assigned any actions - it couldn't be better.

With the BetterToucTool, all buttons of a Bluetooth mouse can be assigned any actions - it couldn't be better.

I put the keyboard shortcut CMD + SHIFT + 4 on the middle mouse button so that I can trigger a screenshot with just one mouse click without twisting my fingers.

The scroll wheel can be moved with a slight notch. This is useful when scrolling through a lot of list items.

The scroll wheel can be moved with a slight notch. This is useful when scrolling through a lot of list items.

By the way, pairing the Maush is pretty easy. There is a slide switch on the underside of the mouse to turn the device on and off. To the right of the sensor is another button that can be used to start pairing the mouse. To do this, if you press it with your fingernail or a pen for about three seconds, the sensor's LED begins to quickly switch between red and blue. With this play of colors, the mouse indicates that it is now in pairing mode. Now open the "Bluetooth" system setting on the Mac and connect the Mac to the mouse. Finished!

Operating instructions for the Satechi M1 Bluetooth mouse as PDF

The operating instructions for the Satechi M1 are available as folded paper. It explains how to pair the mouse with a Windows PC or Mac computer. You can find the instructions here as a searchable PDF document.

Satechi M1 from below: The on / off switch is on the left, while the button for pairing can be seen on the right.

Satechi M1 from below: The on / off switch is on the left, while the button for pairing can be seen on the right.

Clicks louder than the Apple mouse

The mouse click on the Satechi M1 mouse is a little louder and brighter than on the Magic Mouse from Apple, but this may also be due to the fact that my Apple mouse has been "clicked in" and "slipped out" for many years while I still use the Satechi mouse quite fresh. In any case, after a few days I no longer noticed the clicking noise negatively.

Precision of the Satechi mouse

In terms of accuracy, I can't say anything negative either. At first the mouse speed was significantly faster than with my Apple mouse, but the acceleration and maximum speed of the mouse pointer can be readjusted in the system settings. For the reason: Here too, the Satechi mouse works sensitively and precisely after the adjustment.

Here you can see that the Satechi Bluetooth mouse is only slightly higher than the Apple Magic Mouse.

Here you can see that the Satechi Bluetooth mouse is only slightly higher than the Apple Magic Mouse.

Advantages over the Apple Magic Mouse 1 and 2

We remember: The Magic Mouse 1 from Apple (which I also use) is fed with two AA batteries or rechargeable batteries. The successor: The Magic Mouse 2 comes with an internal battery and is charged via a Lightning cable. The downside, however, is that, for aesthetic reasons, Apple placed the charging port on the underside of the mouse, making it impossible to use the mouse while it is charging.

In my opinion, two of these "problems" have been resolved with the Satechi M1:

  1. The Satechi M1 does not rely on Lightning, but on the future-proof USB-C port for charging. I think the Lightning connector will be a thing of the past on all Apple products in a year or two.
  2. The charging port is placed on the front of the Satechi mouse so that the charging cable can be plugged in and the mouse can still be used like a wired USB mouse.

What differentiates the Satechi mouse from the Magic Mouse: It has no touch field and for this reason cannot offer as much freedom when scrolling as the Apple mouse. With the Magic Mouse you can even scroll left and right or diagonally in all directions, as you can swipe your finger in any direction, for example to move an image or a section of a map.

One advantage of the Satechi mouse: You can use it as a wired mouse while charging via the USB-C port.

One advantage of the Satechi mouse: You can use it as a wired mouse while charging via the USB-C port.

Inexpensive alternatives to the Satechi M1

My only criticism of the Satechi mouse is the pricing. At 35 euros it is well below the retail price of a Magic Mouse from Apple, but is still more expensive than other Bluetooth mice from manufacturers such as Logitech or Microsoft, which can be had for 20 to 30 euros. If you don't value a well-known brand, you can even find mice with Bluetooth for less than 15 euros on Amazon. I personally think they are Microsoft Modern Mobile Mouse for just under 30 euros more interesting than the Satechi M1, as it is even more based on the design of the Magic Mouse. But that's a matter of taste. Many users cannot do anything with the flat design of the Apple mouse and may find the Satechi mouse more pleasant to use.

The Magic Mouse 2 from Apple costs around 70 euros, while the Satechi M1 costs around 35 euros.

The Magic Mouse 2 from Apple costs around 70 euros, while the Satechi M1 costs around 35 euros.

My conclusion

I think Satechi did a lot right with the M1, except for the price. In terms of optics, I think the four color options are good to buy to match your own Apple Mac.

When it came to the shape of the Satechi M1 Wireless Mouse, my biggest concern was that my hand was so trapped on the Apple Magic Mouse that I often get painful cramps when using a mouse that is too curved. This often happens within 20 to 30 minutes, for example when I'm sitting at someone else's computer. I had already considered getting a vertical mouse like that Logitech MX Vertical but I fear that I would be completely unproductive for a few days until I have internalized the operation.

With the Satechi M1, I have no problem with my hand, even after hours of "mouse". As you can see in the photo, it is not quite as flat as the Apple Magic Mouse, but still has a significantly flatter design than many other mice.

If you are interested in the Satechi M1 Wireless Mouse, you can find it here at Gold, rose gold, Silver and Space gray. Or - as usual - via this Amazon box. You can then choose the color variants yourself on Amazon.

SATECHI Aluminum M1 Wireless Bluetooth Mouse with Rechargeable Type-C Connector - Compatible...
  • BLUETOOTH 4.0 - Connect to your Bluetooth-enabled computer, laptop or tablet with easy setup...
  • FAST, PRECISE TRACKING - features optical sensors and a resolution of 1200 DPI for precise ...
  • RECHARGEABLE TYPE-C - Say goodbye to disposable batteries with a built-in lithium-ion battery and a ...

 

 

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2 comments

  1. Stef says:

    Thanks for the test. Unfortunately, what she cannot do is scroll diagonally and right-left. The Mighty Mouse is still unmatched there. Unfortunately, there is no adequate successor that is just as ergonomic. Or do you know one?

    • sir appleot says:

      Hello Stef!
      Yes, that's right ... I've already got used to wiping on Apple's Magic and Mighty Mouse. I don't believe there is a third-party mouse that supports this wiping in all directions. Logitech probably has a mouse with which you can tilt the scroll wheel left and right to scroll sideways, but with the Magic Mouse you can even scroll diagonally in any direction, like on a trackpad. I think I'll do an article about the different mice that are out there. That could be interesting!

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