Finally a charger that I have wanted to have in my "fleet" for a long time. If you want to charge a MacBook Pro and an iPad Pro at the same time with USB-C, you can't avoid two USB-C charging ports. Since I've only had power supplies with a USB-C port here, the Aukey charger (here at Amazon) with its two ports is perfect for being put through its paces.

The Aukey PA-D5 is a 60 watt dual-port USB-C charger that can even charge the MacBook Pro without sacrificing speed (photos: Sir Apfelot).

The Aukey PA-D5 is a 60 watt dual-port USB-C charger that can even charge the MacBook Pro (15 inch) without sacrificing speed (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Transparency notice

Aukey sent me the charger for the test and gave it to me free of charge. I received no payment for the contribution and can assure you that Aukey could not influence the content. In terms of objective reporting, I feel more committed to you than to the Aukey employees.

Technical data

The technical data are quickly explained here:

The status LED on the USB-C power supply unit lights up green when the device is supplied with power.

The status LED on the USB-C power supply unit lights up green when the device is supplied with power.

Compared to the Apple USB-C power supply (87 watts)

If you compare the technical data with the Apple USB-C power supply that is supplied with the MacBook Pro, the following advantages and disadvantages arise:

  • approx. 47% less weight
  • approx. 27% less volume
  • approx. 31% less performance

While one can certainly live well with less weight and smaller dimensions, one instinctively does not like to do without the high performance (87 watts) that the Apple power supply offers.
But wrongly, as my MacBook Pro did not use more than 57 watts even under heavy load when I connected the Apple power supply.

Even when I use Geekbench and Youtube on my MacBook Pro, the Aukey power supply is sufficient to charge the MacBook Pro with the same power as the original Apple power supply.

Even when I use Geekbench and Youtube on my MacBook Pro, the Aukey power supply is sufficient to charge the MacBook Pro with the same power as the original Apple power supply.

With the term "under load" I mean the following circumstance: The MacBook Pro runs with a large external monitor, an external hard drive (without its own power supply) is connected, a YouTube video is running, various programs from Photoshop to text editor are open and Geekbench 5 does another benchmark test. I think you can hardly do more to generate the highest possible load.

The fact is that the 60 watts that the Aukey power supply delivers are completely sufficient if you want to charge your MacBook Pro (15 inch). You don't have to accept any compromises compared to the Apple power supply.

The small design of the Aukey power supply is achieved by the fact that the circuits are no longer based on silicon, but function on a gallium nitrite basis. I've got to take advantage of the GaN power supplies a separate contribution written.

The 18 watt port charges the iPad Pro relatively precisely with this power, while the other port draws over 30 watts, if the MBP is not currently using this port.

The 18 watt port charges the iPad Pro relatively precisely with this power, while the other port draws over 30 watts, if the MBP is not currently using this port.

Charging iPad and iPhone

For owners of newer iPad and iPhone models, support for USB Power Delivery 3.0 Interesting. As a result, the devices charge with a higher electrical power than the normal USB-A power supply units that are usually supplied by Apple. Exceptions are the current iPad Pro with USB-C connection, as well as the iPhone 11 Pro models, because here Apple has a USB-C power supply in the scope of delivery, which also supports USB PD.

But here are my measurement results when charging my iPhone and iPad Pro:

  • iPhone XS: approx. 7 watts on both ports
  • iPad Pro 10,5 inches: Port 1: 18 W / Port 2: approx. 28 W.
Most of the time, my MacBook Pro doesn't use more than 55 watts when charging. As soon as the battery is filled, the MBP only draws 20 watts.

Most of the time, my MacBook Pro doesn't use more than 55 watts when charging. As soon as the battery is filled, the MBP only draws 20 watts.

Use and charge iPad Pro and MacBook Pro at the same time

For the next test, I connected my iPad Pro and charged my MacBook Pro. Both devices were running and therefore also have a high power requirement. I was able to measure the following values ​​here:

Simultaneous charging of MacBook Pro and iPad Pro

  • Measured power at the port of the iPad Pro: 18 W.
  • Measured power at the port of the MacBook Pro: 42 W.

The stated values ​​show that you can also charge your MacBook Pro and iPad Pro together on the device. The MacBook Pro then "only" charges with 42 watts instead of the 55 watts that I normally measure on the Apple power supply, but the battery is still charged.

A look at CoconutBattery shows that the battery of the MacBook Pro is charged with approx. 42 watts at 10 watts output power of the power supply unit. The battery fills up slowly while you are working on the MacBook Pro - even if you charge your iPad with approx. 18 watts at the same time.

On the left the Aukey PA-D5 and on the right the Anker PowerPort Atom III - both with 60 watts of power and based on GaN, but I find the Aukey power supply more flexible thanks to the two connections. Nevertheless, the Anker power supply will be presented shortly in a test report (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

Dynamic Detect briefly explained

At this point, of course, comes the Dynamic Detect function of the new Aukey power supply units, because one port of the power supply unit can deliver 60 watts as well as 42 watts. If you only connect your MacBook Pro to the power supply, the laptop benefits from the 60 watts of power, while the charger reduces the power on this port to 42 watts if you connect another device to the second port at the same time.

Incidentally, it does not matter whether the second device really uses up the 18 watts. For me, the output power jumped down to 42 watts when I just plugged the USB-C to Lightning cable without a device into the other port. The charger recognizes that something is connected here and immediately reduces the output.

The two USB-C ports are optically the same, but the upper one delivers a maximum of 18 watts, while the lower one can output up to 60 watts (photos: Sir Apfelot).

The two USB-C ports are optically the same, but the upper one delivers a maximum of 18 watts, while the lower one can output up to 60 watts (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Unfortunately no identification of the ports

Nevertheless, I have to note a small criticism: Since both ports do not deliver the same output power, it would have been nice if they could be somehow differentiated by color. Unfortunately, at the moment you have to remember which port can deliver the 60 watts, because you definitely want to plug in your MacBook Pro here.

I helped myself by simply putting a glue dot on the side. So I can immediately see which is the strong port and which is the weak port.

I used the glue dot to mark which port is suitable for my MacBook Pro. The upper one is more suitable for iPad and iPhone.

I used the glue dot to mark which port is suitable for my MacBook Pro. The upper one is more suitable for iPad and iPhone.

Heat development at a permanent 60 watts

One point that I would also like to note is the heat build-up that occurs when the power supply unit has to deliver 60 watts of output power over a long period of time.

Normally this is not a problem because it does not get so hot that you can no longer put your hand on it. But it could be critical if you put the power supply in a cable box. In this case, you should either ensure good ventilation or you might choose the power adapter from Apple, as it drives less at the limit and only gets lukewarm for me when it charges the MacBook Pro.

If you charge the iPad and MacBook Pro at the same time (and both devices are actually not full), the Aukey charger gets quite warm because it is working at its performance limit.

If you charge the iPad and MacBook Pro at the same time (and both devices are actually not full), the Aukey charger gets quite warm because it is working at its performance limit.

My conclusion: a great power supply

I am excited about that Aukey PA-D5. The ability to charge the iPad and my MacBook Pro at the same time is particularly valuable. The output power of the Aukey USB-C charger is good and should be sufficient for most areas of application.

It might be a bit of a squeeze when Apple releases the 16-inch MacBook Pro, as it probably needs more than 57 watts under load. But these are still visions of the future and there is no technical data about this device.

Such a dual-port USB-C charger is extremely practical, especially for users who have a USB-C iPad Pro and a USB-C MacBook.

As for the price, that's it Aukey PA-D5 with about 60 EUR, of course, well below that Apple USB-C power supply (85 EUR) and also offers two ports for this. It can therefore be used much more flexibly.

Source of supply for the Aukey PA-D5

If you are interested in the Aukey USB-C power supply, you can here on amazon or go through this product box.

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2 comments

  1. chris says:

    Hi,

    thanks for the detailed article that really tests useful areas of application!

    However, I am a little bit surprised at the iPhone XS test.
    I would expect the iPhone XS to be charged with up to 18W via the weaker port, while the MacBook Pro is charged with 45W via the more powerful port.
    After all, the iPhone supports this fast charging speed and from the side of the charger it is possible in the combination iPad Pro / MacBook Pro with said performance ...

    Can you explain why the test on the iPhone XS only showed 7W power?

    • sir appleot says:

      Hello Chris! Unfortunately, I can't tell you that exactly. I have just measured again and attached the iPhone to the MacBook Pro power supply from Apple. Both times the power dropped to about 9-10 watts after a few seconds when charging. The power adapter could certainly deliver 15 watts, but the iPhone XS simply doesn't ask anymore.

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