In the test: USB-C mini dock from Egolggo especially for the MacBook Pro - with charging function

An overview of all devices that had to be used for my tests with the USB-C dock.
Packshot of the USB-C multiport hub from QacQoc (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

Packshot of the USB-C multiport hub from QacQoc (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

Since Apple completely switched the MacBook models to USB-C, the accessory manufacturers for USB-C devices have hardly been slowed down. For this reason you will find no fewer than 15 brands on Amazon that offer their devices if you search for the term "USB-C Dock". Yes, my special favorite is that Belkin Thunderbolt 3 Express Dockthat will sooner or later end up on my desk. But currently it is about a much cheaper mini-dock from Egolggo (QacQoc), which is especially interesting for people who only want to connect a few devices with the old USB-A connector to the MacBook Pro and who now and then use the built-in SD Missing a card reader that was still found in old MacBooks.

QacQoc or Egolggo - what now?

So that there is no confusion that the device can be found with me under the brand name QacQoc and with Amazon under the brand Egolggo: These devices are 100% identical. I ordered the Egolggo Hub on Amazon, but the brand name QacQoc is on the packaging and on the device itself. The model name GN28A can be found in both sources.

Scope of delivery and technical details

The scope of delivery for this device is actually limited to the QacQoc Dock itself, as well as a small cover made of synthetic leather and a quick guide. The technical data is a bit more complex, because the dock's two parallel USB-C ports mean that it can only be used for the matching MacBook Pro models. And that would be the following:

  • the "new" MacBoo Pro 13 inch and 15 inch from 2016
  • as well as all MacBook Pro models (13 and 15 inch; with the Kaby Lake processor) from 2017

Here are the specifications according to the instructions:

  • Model: GN28A USB Type-C multifunctional hub
  • 1x USB 3.1 Type C charging port
  • 1x USB 3.1 Type C data transfer port
  • 1x SD card slot
  • 1x micro SD card slot
  • 2x USB 3.0 ports

You can reach the Egolggo / QacQoc support via email support@qacqoc.com.

Should problems arise with the hub, you can contact the QacQoc support by email. A nice touch to add this card to the product.

Should problems arise with the hub, you can contact the QacQoc support by email. A nice touch to add this card to the product.

Technical limits of the hub

With regard to the devices that can be connected, there are still some limitations in the instructions, but I cannot confirm all of them. I have listed them here and wrote my experiences behind them:

  • According to the manufacturer, the charging port delivers up to 61 W.
    In my case, at times even 4,18 amps flowed into the dock (measured with the Satechi USB-C multimeter) which is roughly 19,9 watts at 83 volts. This means that even the large 15-inch MacBook Pro is charged at top speed via this dock.
  • The maximum capacity of the connectable USB-A hard drives is 2 TB.
    Again, I have to disagree, because I tried the dock with a 4 TB Seagate hard drive, which ran smoothly on all USB-A ports.
  • The micro SD or SD card may have a maximum of 64 GB.
    Here, too, the limit is higher up. My 128 GB micro SD card from SanDisk was also read without restrictions.
In the instructions for the hub you can read how the individual ports and their technical limitations are defined. In practice, however, the values ​​are less tightly set.

In the instructions for the hub you can read how the individual ports and their technical limitations are defined. In practice, however, the values ​​are less tightly set.

Quality and service

The manufacturing quality of the dock is definitely high. The case is made of an aluminum alloy and it clicks into place cleanly when you plug it into the MacBook Pro. The connections are also fine. Problems with inserting the micro SD card, as I have already experienced with other card readers, did not arise here.

Another plus point, which unfortunately cannot be taken for granted with this type of mini-docks: You can operate two USB-A hard drives at the same time without an external power supply. The devices together may consume a maximum of 1,5 amps. According to the USB multimeter, my mobile 2,5 inch hard drives consume approx. 500 to 600 mA each. So there is still enough room for improvement.

With other docks it has happened to me that after a few minutes the hard drives were suddenly disconnected because apparently there was no longer enough power available for a short time. In the worst case, this can lead to data loss, because if the disk is busy rewriting its "table of contents" and you then unplug it without logging it off first, it becomes unreadable for the computer. Then only helps here Data recovery software and good luck.

With the QacQoc USB-C multifunctional hub, the disks ran through the entire time without interference - that's how it should be.

The USB-C multimeter can be used to measure the charging current that flows into the dock. It's only 870 mAh here - a sign that the MacBook Pro is full and bored. ;-)

The USB-C multimeter can be used to measure the charging current that flows into the dock. It's only 870 mAh here - a sign that the MacBook Pro is well filled and bored. ;-)

A charging function as it should be

I had already tested some of these mini docks. In the best case, you have charged my MacBook Pro with 40-50 W, which is usually only enough to keep the MacBook happy in terms of batteries. There could be no question of a full charge.

That's why I was excited about the QacQoc Dock to see what it could deliver in this regard. To find the limit, I discharged my MacBook Pro a little on battery power and then with it Photolemur optimized a few photos. The program already got my old MacBook Pro (2012) going, and that's how it was here. When the software is busy calculating, the display is at maximum brightness and the battery is also being charged, the mini-hub draws approx. 4 amps of current. This allows you to charge the MacBook Pro with around 80 W via the USB-C hub - just as it works directly via the USB-C port on the MacBook Pro. Another hurdle that the QacQoc Mini-Dock has mastered.

Testing the speed

To check whether the dock is slowing down the connected devices (hard drives, USB sticks, SD card, etc.), I made various speed comparisons with the Aja system test carried out.

I used the following devices for the tests:

The first thing I tried was the SD card port. The SD card was tested once in the Egolggo Hub and once with the Kiwibird USB-C card reader directly on the MacBook Pro.

An overview of all devices that had to be used for my tests with the USB-C dock.

An overview of all devices that had to be used for my tests with the USB-C dock.

SD card reader versus USB-C hub

With the Kiwibird card reader, I achieved a transfer rate of 10 MB / s (writing) and 19 MB / s (reading). While the dock also managed 10 MB / s when writing, but the Kiwibird SD card reader "ran away" when reading with 81 MB / s.

Tests with external hard drives on the USB-A ports

As mentioned above, the USB-C hub has two USB-A sockets. I connected the Seagate hard drive to both and wrote a 4GB file with the benchmarking software Aja System Test and measured the average speed. For comparison, the same hard drive was then plugged into the Anker USB-C adapter and directly into the MacBook Pro. The following results came out:

  • Hard drive via USB-A on the dock: 111 MB / s writing and 99 MB / s reading
  • Hard disk via anchor adapter on the MBP: 91 MB / s writing and 110 MB / s reading

In view of the sometimes strong fluctuations in speed (which arise, among other things, when you test the data throughput when the Mac is doing other things in the background here and there) I would say that you will not notice any noticeable difference.

Anyone who is fundamentally interested in whether a hub slows down data transmission can do this read my test with a USB 3.0 hub.

Hard drive not provided on the USB-C port

It is already in the manual that the two USB-C ports are not "full-fledged", but I still wanted to try out what works in practice with the ports.

My 2,5-inch hard drive could technically be connected to both USB-C ports on the hub with the adapter, but it was only mounted when connected via the USB-C charging port in the Finder. In practice you will hardly do this, because without the charging port you would have to plug in the charging cable on the right side of the MacBook Pro and then you can plug in the hard drive on the right of the MBP and the charging cable in the port provided on the USB-C hub.

The speed of the hard drive is also slowed down a bit at the hub's charging port and brings about 86 MB / s (write) and 84 MB / s (read).

In practical terms, one USB port on the hub is intended for the charging cable, while the other port is used to connect your iPhone (with a Lightning to USB-C cable) can charge and synchronize.

The QacQoc / Egolggo Mini-Hub works reliably and fits in every laptop bag. An accessory that I always take with me when traveling.

The QacQoc / Egolggo Mini-Hub works reliably and fits in every laptop bag. An accessory that I always take with me when traveling.

Conclusion on the USB-C multifunction hub

I have to say that I was particularly interested in the speed of the connected hard drives and the charging current during the test. The card reader is a nice gadget that I take with me, as I have to read something from an SD card here and there, but external hard drives are almost always attached to my MacBook.

The Egolggo / QacQoc Hub can score with good values ​​in both respects, so I can list it here as a recommendation with a clear conscience. Of course, an HDMI connection would have been great because I need it for my external monitor, but then the hub would again be a lot bigger and more expensive.

If you are interested in the device, you will find it here on amazon.

Egolggo USB-C multifunctional hub
This small hub for the USB Type-C port connects USB-C to USB-A adapter and SD card reader for the MacBook Pro 2016/2017. The two USB-C ports are looped through, so that there is also a charging function with 61 watts (according to the manufacturer). For me, the device charges with about 80 watts of power on the MacBook Pro 2017 Kaby Lake (15 inches).

Disclaimer

Because every now and then readers ask about it in test reports: The product mentioned here was made available to me by the manufacturer for a test. No money has flowed and I don't feel obliged to rate a product as good that I don't think is good.

Here I see myself more responsible for my readers to give an honest rating, because I'd rather annoy a manufacturer with a reasonably poor rating than many readers with a supposedly good rating for a lousy product.

However, if products are really bad, they usually don't get a platform on my blog. You can assume that the product (from my subjective point of view) is not total rubbish if I take the time to write about it. ;)

 

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The page contains affiliate links / images: Amazon.de

2 comments

  1. chris says:

    Hello Sir Apfelot,

    During my search for a proper and suitable adapter, I did not read great mountain ratings from a wave of various products and now came across your blog, which seems to me to be very serious and professional. I am not very knowledgeable in this area. That's why I ask you: Have you also tested adapters that have an HDMI 4K connection that do not immediately switch off the WLAN or damage my Macbook. I am a student and have to give presentations with my Macbook. Carrying several adapter cables with you is not a problem, but why not kill several birds with one stone. Thank you for sharing your passion with us. I will definitely read it more often.

    Mit freundlichen Grüßen

    chris

    • Sir Apfelot says:

      Hello Chris! Do you have the current MacBook Pro? Or an older model? I ask as I am this adapter from Eglggo with HDMI output here have. The test report is still pending, but it works flawlessly on my MacBook Pro 2017 and also delivers a good picture. Only the 4K I couldn't test because I don't have a monitor or TV with 4K resolution. LG! Jens

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