In the test: Jiga GN1 power bank with 30.000 mAh, LED flashlight and Lightning charging connection

Jiga GN1 Powerbank in the test

I don't know how many power banks are in my office. It must be around twenty or thirty. And my previous additional battery, which I prefer to work with, is this Zendure A8PD. So if a new power bank comes into my house for a test report, it has to compete with this - highly recommended, but unfortunately not very cheap - power pack.

So too Jiga GBN1 power bankwhich the manufacturer made available to me for a test. From my point of view, the special thing about the Jiga battery is its capacity of 30.000 mAh, because most batteries have a maximum capacity of 26.800 mAh. Accordingly, my curiosity about the Jiga product was aroused.

A power bank with a flashlight function is always a practical thing (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

A power bank with a flashlight function is always a practical thing (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

The technical data of the Jiga GN1

Before we get to my measurements, I would like to briefly list the technical details of the power bank so that you can read the key data briefly:

  • Manufacturer: Jiga
  • Model: GN1
  • Capacity: 30.000 mAh or 111 Wh
  • Connections: 3x USB-A, 1x USB-C, 1x Lightning, 1x Micro-USB
  • Output power: 5 V / 2,1 A (total)
  • Charging the power bank via USB-C, Lightning or Micro-USB
  • Load-through function: yes
  • USB C Power Delivery: nO
  • Flashlight function: yes
  • Dimensions: 155 x 76 x 35 mm
  • Source: Amazon (approx. 33 euros)
Here you can see an overview of all connections of the power bank - as well as the flashlight function.

Here you can see an overview of all connections of the power bank - as well as the flashlight function.

No USB-C Power Delivery when charging (In / Out)

The bad news first: The Jiga Powerbank does not have a quick charge function via USB-C Power Delivery. For many people that should be a reason not to choose the battery. You just have to come to terms with the fact that neither the charging of the power bank itself nor the charging of the connected devices is fast.

The power bank itself needs from 0 to 100 percent a good 11 hours of charging time. My iPhone 12 Pro Max charges with 5 volts instead of the usual 9 volts that I get when I plug it into a USB-C PD charger. Here, too, you have to reckon with around 50 percent more loading time.

The hidden advantage of this is of course that the entire charging process is very gentle on the battery, because the slower you charge the battery, the less heat is generated, which in turn affects the life of the battery cells less.

Despite the capacity, the Jiga GN1 has a handy form factor.

Despite the capacity, the Jiga GN1 has a handy form factor. Sure, it is not particularly suitable for your pocket, but you can have it with you in your backpack without any problems.

Total output power maximum 13 watts

The specification of 2,1 amps and 5 volts as output power in the technical data is calculated across all ports. That doesn't sound like much, especially if you plan to load a MacBook with it. The Powerbank cannot actually be used for this, as it does not support USB Power Delivery either. Even the 12 inch MacBook has between 20 and 30 watts when charging, which the Jiga Powerbank cannot do with.

I have two for testing USB load resistors hung on the USB-A ports and got a total current of about 2,7 amps. However, the voltage has already dropped to 4 volts, which shows that we are working at the limit of the power bank.

When I asked for even more power, the power bank switched itself off. So if you want to charge an iPad and iPhone at the same time, you have to expect that the charging of the devices will not go very quickly. But sometimes it doesn't have to be.

So if you have no problems with slow charging, you will now experience the positive points of the Jiga Powerbank.

With the load resistor I discharged the power bank and measured the capacity.

With the load resistor I discharged the power bank and measured the capacity.

80 watt hours of capacity in practice

To see how much capacity the power banks can deliver in practice on my test stand, I discharge them with a USB load resistor and connect a USB multimeter in between to record how many watt hours have passed through.

I like to use my Zendure A8PD for comparison, as it has quite good values. If I discharge this, I get about 40 watt hours.

I also discharged the Jiga Powerbank in the same way and repeated the process three times because I didn't want to believe the measured values. The Jiga delivered 80 watt hours and thus offers twice the capacity of my (used!) Zendure A8PD.

This is surprising in that the Zendure with 26.800 mAh should only have a little less capacity than the Jiga Powerbank with 30.000 mAh. Strictly speaking, only 12 percent less.

Zendure with "theoretical" 99 watt hours

The big difference is probably due to the fact that I have been using the Zendure for years and therefore lost capacity.

On the manufacturer's website of Zendure I was able to find out that the A8PD normally has 99 watt hours, which is of course a calculated value. In practice, you usually achieve less because the battery cells are never completely discharged. This would severely damage the cells and is therefore avoided by an early electronic switch-off.

Fortunately, I had it years ago Zendure A8QC with 26.800 mAh in the test and measured a capacity of 84 Wh at the time. This gives us a practical value that should also apply to a new Zendure A8PD. And this is higher than the measured value for the Jiga.

The charging of the power bank and also the charging of devices with the power bank only works with 5 volts and a maximum of 2,1 amps - this ensures long charging times (Photo: Sir Apfelot).

The charging of the power bank and also the charging of devices with the power bank only works with 5 volts and a maximum of 2,1 amps - this ensures long charging times (Photo: Sir Apfelot).

Jiga Powerbank delivers 80 Wh in practice

With the measured 80 watt hours, the Jiga is - although it advertises more mAh - a little below the capacity of the Zendure Powerbank. Still, the value is quite good when you consider that the Zendure costs more than twice as much. I assume that the Zendure simply scores with more efficient charging electronics and better battery cells and thus achieves more capacity when measuring.

Practical: charging via Lightning cable and flashlight function

The Jiga Powerbank has two more features that the Zendure A8 does not offer: On the one hand, it can be charged via a Lightning cable (or via USB-C or Micro-USB) and, on the other hand, it has a built-in LED flashlight, which it does especially exciting for camping trips.

Charging via a Lightning plug has proven to be very practical for me in the past with other power banks, because this type of charging cable just flies around in an Apple household.

The fresh Zendure Powerbank delivers another 4 Wh more than the Jiga Powerbank - but it also costs more than twice as much as the Jiga Powerbank.

The fresh Zendure Powerbank delivers another 4 Wh more than the Jiga Powerbank - but it also costs more than twice as much as the Jiga Powerbank.

My conclusion: inexpensive all-rounder for iPhone and iPad

The Jiga is definitely not the greatest power bank in the world. If I don't have to watch out for the money, I'm guaranteed to find something better. But for a little more than 30 euros, the Jiga gives you a good power bank with lots of connections and even a built-in LED flashlight.

The workmanship is fine too. It doesn't look rickety and should be able to withstand one or two falls. On an expedition, however, I would prefer to take the Zendure with me, because you can also take a car over it.

Due to the output power, I would only recommend the power bank for smartphones and tablets. I think, with an iPad Pro and a little patience, you can still get it fully charged, but I see black with a MacBook or even a MacBook Pro, because they call up more power so that they can charge themselves during operation. For such cases I would rather go to Zendure Supertank power bank grab, which delivers 60 or 100 watts of output power.

I was wondering whether the Jiga Powerbank had what it takes Pick of the week has, but I think it would have to deliver more watt hours and offer USB C Power Delivery. The “Pick of the Week” award is really only reserved for particularly great products (Sorry, Jiga).

Nevertheless, the Jiga is okay if you can live with a longer loading time. If you like, you can get it look here on Amazon or use this product box:

JIGA Powerbank 30000mAh External Battery Portable Charger USB C Power Bank, 3 inputs and 3 ...
  • Extremely high capacity 30000mAh: With the high capacity you can charge your battery smoothly. It offers 9 ...
  • 3 inputs and 3 outputs: the external battery can be charged with a cable micro USB flash or type C. The 3...
  • The power bank has built-in that are bright enough to help in emergency situations. The pursues the ...

Jiga GN1 manual

The manual for the Jiga power bank is a small folder in various languages. I once took a picture of the German pages for you and - obviously rather bumbling - put them together. But maybe it will still help one or the other reader:

The operating instructions for the Jiga Powerbank - here in German and in astonishingly poor quality (from me).

The operating instructions for the Jiga Powerbank - here in German and in astonishingly poor quality (from me).

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The page contains affiliate links / images: Amazon.de

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