In the test: Orico A3H13P2 - active USB 3.0 hub with 13 ports and 2 fast charging ports

In the test: the Orico 15-port hub

The last few weeks the USB ports on my MacBook Pro and the one already connected Aukey 4-port USB-C hub (Recommended hub if you don't have many hard drives!) very scarce. Two external hard drives, a Time Machine drive, an external monitor and various charging plugs occupy even seven USB ports relatively reliably.

For this reason, I recently invested in a USB hub that finally solves the problem with the lack of ports: In the Orico A3H13P2. It is an active USB 3.0 hub (active means that it is equipped with its own power supply unit) that has no fewer than 15 ports. Two of these ports are fast charge ports that can deliver 5 volts and up to 2,4 amps, but which cannot be used for data transfer.

Finally a hub that can handle all my peripheral devices and still has a few ports free - the Orico A3H13P2 (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

Finally a hub that can handle all my peripheral devices and still has a few ports free - the Orico A3H13P2 (Photos: Sir Apfelot).

Technical data of the Orico A3H13P2

The Orico Hub has quite impressive specs - in terms of size and weight as well as in terms of the power that it can distribute via its 15 ports. Here are the details:

  • 13 data ports + 2 smart charge ports (up to 2,4 A)
  • Data ports with USB 3.0 SuperSpeed ​​(5 Gbps)
  • Power pack with 12 V and 5 A (total power: 60 W)
  • Chip: VL812 USB3.0
  • Size: 26 x 5 x 5 cm
  • Weight: 414 grams
  • Material: anodized aluminum
  • Stand-by power consumption (measured by yourself): 0,8 watts
Clear design and anodized aluminum - with the Orico Hub you can also defend yourself if a burglar shows up.

Clear design and anodized aluminum - with the Orico Hub you can also defend yourself if a burglar shows up.

Ok, with its weight and dimensions, the hub is definitely not for traveling around the world, but for me it is stationary on my desk and can weigh as much as it wants. His main tasks for me are:

  • many ports to provide connectivity for printers, scanners, iOS devices, SD card readers and hard drives
  • provide enough power for iPhone, iPad and various hard drives
  • offer fast data transfer between Mac and hard drives or USB sticks
  • have low power consumption in standby

Connection of the hub with USB type C to type B cable

It was also important to me that it had a USB connection cable that could be unplugged. I've been working on a MacBook Pro that only has USB-C ports for years. Accordingly, I have to be able to plug the hub into a type C port with an adapter or a cable.

But I don't want to use an adapter here, but to be able to use my own cable. The background to this is that I like to reduce the plug connections to a minimum and didn't want to work with a USB-C adapter, but with a USB-C to USB-B cable.

If you want to adopt this structure for your Mac or MacBook, I recommend this to you USB Type C to Type B cable from CableMatters. When choosing, it is important that the cable supports USB 3, otherwise you run the risk of getting a USB-C printer cable that only supports USB 2 and massively slows down the hub and all connected devices. The Linked Cable from CableMatters fulfills this point.

The hub is powered by a 60 watt power supply. The thing isn't particularly pretty, but at 12 x 5 x 3 cm, it's not particularly large either.

The hub is powered by a 60 watt power supply. The thing isn't particularly pretty, but at 12 x 5 x 3 cm, it's not particularly large either.

Enough power for everything? Yes!

After me the Amazon ratings of the Orico Hub I was a little confused because a customer complained that the hub wouldn't even provide enough power for two external hard drives. Another customer reported irregular disconnections - also a condition that you don't want a hub to have.

Despite these two bad reviews (and because of some 5-star reviews), I bought the Orico 15-port hub and I still don't regret this step to this day. Of course, I put it through its paces as soon as I received it.

Several hard drives and various other devices had to be used for my test, because I wanted to know whether the hub really had enough power to operate all my hard drives and also charge the iPad and iPhone.

I gave it my all, but the hub wouldn't buckle - all the hard drives don't have their own power supply and run through the hub.

I gave it my all, but the hub wouldn't buckle - all the hard drives don't have their own power supply and run through the hub.

To make it short: Yes, it has plenty of power reserves and I haven't had a disconnection so far. For my test, I plugged in the following devices:

  • three 2,5 inch hard drives, each of which requires approx. 500 mA
  • an SSD that consumes around 300 to 400 mA
  • an iPad Pro
  • an iPhone XS
  • an empty 26.500 mAh Power Bank
  • a Kindle Fire
  • a podcast microphone
  • a monitor light from BenQ (highly recommended, here in the test / needs approx. 800 mA)
  • two printers and a document scanner

I really felt guilty about the hub because I tormented it with so many devices, but it took everything well. Incidentally, the two smart charging ports are hardly different from the other 13 ports, because although they do not have a data connection to the connected computer, they also offer plenty of power. My connected power bank charges at these ports with 5 volts and 1,9 amps, my iPad Pro and my iPhone XS with 5 volts and 1,5 amps. With this hub, there will no longer be a shortage of electricity in the future.

Practical: There is even a Super Charger Port at the hub that you can use to charge your Tesla! No ... it was just kidding ... with 2,4 A power, it is enough even for the large iPad Pro models and huge power banks.

Practical: There is even a Super Charger Port at the hub that you can use to charge your Tesla! No ... it was just kidding ... with 12 watts of power, it is enough even for the large iPad Pro models and huge power banks.

Speed ​​test with rotating hard disk and SSD

Another important point for me is data transfer. It would be a shame if the hub would have to accept speed losses when using hard drives. To check this, I have one Seagate 2,5 inch hard drive (highly recommended!) and the Teyadi SSD with a USB-C port, once directly on the MacBook Pro and once on the hub with the Aja System Test benchmarking tool checked.

Here, too, the result speaks in favor of the hub: I couldn't find any major differences with the two hard drives and would only like to show the screenshots of the Teyadi SSD here. In the screenshot above you can see the speed over the hub and below the results directly on the MacBook Pro. In both cases, the SSD achieves approx. 160 MB / s when writing and approx. 400 MB / s when reading.

Here are the data transfer rates (measured with the Aja System Test) when the Teyadi SSD ran over the hub.

Here are the data transfer rates (measured with the Aja System Test) when the Teyadi SSD ran over the hub.

 

Here are the benchmarks for the Teyadi SSD when it was connected directly to the MacBook Pro.

Here are the benchmarks for the Teyadi SSD when it was connected directly to the MacBook Pro.

Power consumption - comfortably low

The power consumption was another point that I wanted to find out by taking measurements. When all my devices were connected, this one was with one when measuring Socket meter between 25 and 28 watts. After I disconnected all the devices, it went down to 0,8 watts.

Since the hub has a central on / off switch, I also measured whether there was a difference between standby when it was switched on and when it was switched off. Here, however, the measured value was 0,8 watts in both cases. With an electricity price of EUR 0,28 per kWh, this means electricity costs of just under EUR 2 per year.

If the MacBook Pro is switched off (not in sleep mode!) You can switch off the hub using the button and save power.

If the MacBook Pro is switched off (not in sleep mode!) You can switch off the hub using the button (to the right of the power plug) and save power.

Aluminum housing useful for cooling

The aluminum housing may at first only be designed for optics, but the solid construction made of the light metal also makes perfect technical sense. On the one hand, the hub is almost indestructible and, on the other hand, the heat dissipation through the aluminum is very effective. After a few hours, the hub got lukewarm, even though I only withdrew 28 watts from it. I can imagine that it will get significantly warmer at the power limit of 60 watts. The aluminum housing distributes the heat very well.

The production of aluminum was certainly not just a design decision and helps a lot with heat dissipation when the hub is required in terms of performance.

The production of aluminum was certainly not just a design decision and helps a lot with heat dissipation when the hub is required in terms of performance.

My conclusion: a great hub

The Orico Hub has met all of my requirements so far - and they were quite demanding. Hubs with 15 ports are rare and I'm all the happier that I've now found one that not only looks good, but also works perfectly technically.

I haven't been able to do a long-term test as I've only been using the hub for a few days, but if new findings come to light, I'll add them in the article.

Based on my current experience, you can Orico A3H13P2 Unreservedly recommend, especially if you need many ports and enough power for many hard drives. The on / off switch and the plug-in connection cable are - just like the appealing LED lighting of the ports - the icing on the cake.

25% plus 5% discount on Amazon

If you need an active hub with many ports (haha!), Take a look at the Orico A3H13P2 here at Amazon or goes through this product box:

ORICO 60W USB Hub (USB 3.0 * 13 ports) aluminum data hub with 2 USB ports Charger high-end, ...
  • 【Material】 - Smooth aluminum is ideal for your Mac, Apple-style, aluminum housing a natural extension ...
  • 【Interface】 - It has 13 USB3.0 transmission interfaces with a super-potent 5V2.4A ...
  • 【Compatibility】 - Compatible with Windows (32/64 bit) 10 / 8.1 / 8/7 / Vista / XP, Mac OS X 10.6 to 10.9, Linux ...

Orico is currently also offering a 25% discount for the hub - valid until November 30.11.2019, 3. To get the discount, simply enter the code "DEBRCJ5S" at the checkout in Amazon. Furthermore, I was just able to activate a 41,29% discount with a click of the mouse, so that I ended up with a final price of XNUMX EUR. A very good price for so much stroke. : D

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The page contains affiliate links / images: Amazon.de

6 comments

  1. Hans Ihlenfeldt says:

    Which hub can you plug into the new iMac on the lower right edge?
    Best regards,
    Hans

    • Sir Apfelot says:

      Hello Hans! Actually, you can plug in anyone there that has a USB-A connector. The question is rather what it should do and how many ports you need. For example, if you are using external hard drives without their own power supply, I would recommend an active hub that also provides power. If you have a little more information for me (number of ports, for which devices, etc.), I'll be happy to help with the selection.

  2. dietz says:

    hello USB pros!

    I'm considering switching from a 2009 Apple laptop to a 2018 one.
    a lot has happened in the meantime (technically)

    But I also have a lot of USB2 devices ... keyboard mouse, FW and USB hard drives, printer, sound system, ...

    Does that even pack this little USB-C thing?
    (So ​​you need such an ugly adapter in any case) or can you bury things in a box (2m away) with a long cable?

    • Jens Kleinholz says:

      Hello Dietz! Sure, the small USB port can do that. Incidentally, it has more power than all the USB sockets before. ;-) A 2 meter cable is also no problem. There shouldn't even be a slowdown. You can pack an active USB hub like the Orico in a (ventilated!) Box and then plug everything into it. Only an external monitor needs to be connected directly to USB C.

      • dietz says:

        ok, thank you very much for the detailed answer, it will be more of a mid 2017 with a lot of sockets;)

        lg
        from Vienna
        dietz

        • Jens Kleinholz says:

          Oh ... 2017 MacBook Pro? With the broken keyboard ??? I wouldn't advise ... but ok. To each his own. : D

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