In the test: Wired "LMP Easy Mouse" 2-in-1 mouse with USB-C and USB-A connection

Test of the LMP Easy Mouse 2-in-1

One might wonder why in the world they would want to use a wired USB mouse instead of a Bluetooth mouse. But I actually have a good reason: With a USB mouse, the batteries cannot be empty at inconvenient times because the mouse is supplied with power via USB.

New batteries are usually not a problem when you're at home, but I like to take my Magic Mouse from Apple with me when I'm on the move with the MacBook Pro and it is not uncommon for the mouse to choose this exact time to start with Message "Connection lost" to acknowledge the service because the batteries are empty.

I rarely work with the trackpad and I am very ineffective when I have to work my way through the window with it. So I only use it when I have absolutely no alternative - and I try to minimize these moments.

Wired, but that's why it's interesting for me as a travel mouse - always with me in my laptop bag.

Wired, but that's why it's interesting for me as a travel mouse - always with me in my laptop bag.

The solution: A wired USB mouse for on the go

So that I always have a functioning mouse with me when I go on trips with the MacBook Pro in the future, I am now packing a wired mouse in my laptop bag - a second mouse for on the go, so to speak, while my Magic Mouse stays on the desk.

The LMP PR agency recently sent me the right model for this project: Die LMP 20442 Easy Mouse 2-in-1. Why does it have the addition "2-in-1" in its name? Because the mouse has a USB-C connection on the cable and a USB-C to USB-A adapter is also firmly connected to the cable, so that you are prepared for any USB socket.

If I connect the mouse to my 15-inch MacBook Pro, I use the USB-C connector and if I work with a USB-C hub on the 12-inch MacBook, I can use the USB-A connector to connect the USB -C port on the hub free for charging the MacBook.

The USB adapter is firmly attached to the cable and always with you - you simply cannot forget or lose it (photos: Sir Apfelot).

The USB adapter is firmly attached to the cable and always with you - you simply cannot forget or lose it (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Construction based on Apple mouse

What is immediately noticeable when looking at the LMP mouse are the shape and color, which are strongly reminiscent of the Apple mouse. That suits me because I quickly get a cramped hand with other mouse shapes. What is also nice is the built-in scroll wheel. This does not offer the functionality like the touch surface of the Magic Mouse, where you can scroll left and right by swiping, but at least you have the possibility to move comfortably easily through lists or selection fields.

The scroll wheel is also clickable and can be used as a middle mouse button with software such as USB overdrive can be assigned as required.

The LMP device cannot be denied a certain similarity to the Apple mouse (photos: Sir Apfelot).

The LMP device cannot be denied a certain similarity to the Apple mouse (photos: Sir Apfelot).

Mouse accuracy and click sounds

What made me very puzzled during the test was the following behavior of the mouse: I put it down to type and suddenly the mouse pointer began to move across the screen in jumps every few seconds. At first I thought the sensor was going crazy because of my lacquered tabletop, but the jumps in the mouse pointer also occurred when I placed the mouse on a mousepad.

Of course, it wasn't a problem with the mouse, I was stupid: I had connected my wireless Magic Mouse from Apple to the Mac during the test and every shock at the table caused the Apple mouse to transmit movement commands. These caused the mouse pointer to jump.

The sensor on the LMP mouse works fine - you just shouldn't have any other mouse connected to the Mac.

The sensor on the LMP mouse works fine - you just shouldn't have any other mouse connected to the Mac.

When the second mouse was switched off, there were no more problems. The precision of the LMP mouse is very good and although I have set the pointer movement to maximum in the system settings, I hit all the spots on my 27 inch monitor as desired. There is no difference to the Apple mouse here.

Perhaps worth mentioning are the clicking noises, which are a little louder than the Apple Magic Mouse. This could be due to the fact that my Apple mouse has had many years of clicks and therefore certainly many thousands of clicks. The clicks on the LMP mouse may sound quieter over time. They are currently clearly audible, but far from being "annoying".

My conclusion: not exactly cheap, but good

The price of 40 euros definitely disqualifies the LMP mouse as a cheap solution if you are looking for a new mouse and mainly pay attention to the price. Nevertheless, the Easy Mouse 2-in-1 from LMP meets my taste, as it includes all the advantages that were important to me for the additional mouse:

  • Apple-typical design like the Magic Mouse
  • Scroll wheel (which also works as a middle mouse button)
  • wired, without rechargeable batteries or batteries
  • can be connected to USB-A and USB-C ports
The scroll wheel of the LMP mouse can be assigned any functions as a middle mouse button, for example when using USB overdrive.

The scroll wheel of the LMP mouse can be assigned any functions as a middle mouse button, for example when using USB overdrive.

Of course you can also achieve all of this via detours and, for example, a Microsoft mouse take, which is also close to the design of the Apple Mouse. Since it is wireless, it works on every Mac - whether with USB-C or USB-A, but you still have the problem with the batteries, but you only have to invest 30 euros.

The second solution would be: get one Magic Mouse 2 with built-in battery and the option of charging it via a Lightning port. Then you pack a USB-C to USB-A adapter and a Lightning charging cable in the bag and you end up with more than double the price of the LMP mouse.

Or you can get a cheap China replica of the Apple mouse and a USB-C adapter and get annoyed about the rickety construction, but you have saved a full 20 euros.

I am still in favor of the solution with that LMP mouse. For this reason, it is now always my loyal companion in the MacBook case.

3,15 EUR
LMP 20442 Easy Mouse USB-C with 2-pulse ducks and castors, white / aluminum
  • Connections: USB-C and USB-A (2 in 1), wired
  • Double button + wheel
  • White finish and satin aluminum

 

 

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4 comments

  1. Julian says:

    I use the trackball and mouse with scroll wheel and the Magicmouse 2 at the same time on the Mac, because each device has its advantages depending on the application and mood. Otherwise you can get around mouse hand and cabal tunnel syndrome.

    • Sir Apfelot says:

      You could add a vertical mouse to the arsenal. These things are supposed to help prevent the mouse hand. I once connected it as a test, but of course you are much slower and less precise in the beginning than with the usual mouse. But it didn't feel weird or bad.

  2. Christian says:

    Hallo,
    I have been using the MS-1657C mouse for less than 30 days and now I can no longer scroll.
    Even if I carefully move the scroll wheel down, it keeps jumping.
    Do you still have the mouse?

    • Sir Apfelot says:

      Hello Christian! Yes I have. And it's still running ... no problems so far. But if you use them for less than 30 days, you can safely have them exchanged.

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