In the test: 3-way USB-C charger from Ugreen for the wall socket

In the test: the Ugreen Multiport USB-C charger

For me, the devices with a USB-C port are slowly stacking up. From Mac to various headphones to power banks, many manufacturers rely on this connection. I keep noticing that you can actually have enough of these charging options. If my kids come with two iPhones, then play on my iPads and I also come to charge my iPhone, then some charging ports are occupied very quickly.

Ugreen offers one for this 4-way charger, which has 3x USB-C and 1x USB-A as output. With a total of 65 watts, all kinds of consumers can be served - even a MacBook Pro.

I asked Ugreen for a free device for testing purposes. Since you have sent this to me, I can now give you my assessment of the power supply.

The Ugreen power supply offers many connections to power its USB-C devices. For me, a "must-have" at my desk where I use MacBook Pro, iPad and iPhone (Photo: Sir Apfelot).

The Ugreen power supply offers many connections to power its USB-C devices. For me, a "must-have" at my desk where I use MacBook Pro, iPad and iPhone (Photo: Sir Apfelot).

Technical data of the Ugreen charger

  • Manufacturer: Ugreen Group Limited
  • Model: CD224
  • Power: 65 watts total on USB-C and 22,5 watts on USB-A
  • Technology: GaN (gallium nitrite)
  • Ports: 3x USB C and 1x USB A
  • Charging standards: Power Delivery 3.0, Quick Charge 4.0 / 3.0, SCP, AFC, PPS
  • Input: 100-240 V / 50-60 Hz
  • USB output C1 / C2: 5V / 3A; 9V / 3A; 12V / 3A; 15V / 3A; 20V / 3,25A (65W max.)
  • USB output C3: 5V / 3A; 9V / 2A; 12V / 1,5A (18W max.)
  • USB A output: 4,5V / 5A; 5V / 4,5A; 5V / 3A; 9V / 2A; 12V / 1,5A (22,5W max.)
  • Dimensions: 6,5 6,5 x x 3,3 cm
  • Weight: 300g
  • Standby consumption (measured by yourself): 0,1 - 0,2 W.
  • Price: approx. 50 to 60 EUR (here at Amazon)

Distribution of power over the ports

As always with the multiport USB-C chargers, it is important to note how the power is distributed over the ports. Because "65 watts of power" does not necessarily mean that you get 65 watts at each of the three ports.

This is also the case here, because only ports 1 and 2 deliver 65 watts if none of the other 4 ports is occupied. For example, if you use ports 1 and 2, the first port can deliver 45 watts and the second 18 watts (over USB Power Delivery).

Since it gets quite complex if you want to list all combinations here, I have a small graphic from Ugreen that shows the loading capacity of the ports in connection with the occupancy. In this case, an asterisk means that the port is unused.

This table shows the distribution of the power over the individual ports depending on which are occupied (source: Ugreen).

This table shows the distribution of the power over the individual ports depending on which are occupied (source: Ugreen).

You can see that it is best to charge a MacBook Pro at port 1, because there it gets 45 watts or more in almost all combinations. Devices such as the iPad or iPhone can then be charged at ports 2 and 3, because they can handle 18 watts of power.

With three USB-C outputs and one USB-A output, a number of devices can be charged. The Ugreen power supply also supports numerous fast charging standards such as USB Power Delivery, which is used by Apple.

With three USB-C outputs and one USB-A output, a number of devices can be charged. The Ugreen power supply also supports numerous fast charging standards such as USB Power Delivery, which is used by Apple.

Optics and technical processing

Chargers rarely have fancy designs. No wonder, as they are usually supposed to be practical rather than pretty. With the Ugreen power supply you can at least say that it is nice and small and inconspicuous thanks to the gallium nitride technology.

The ports are aligned frontally so that you can easily access it when it is plugged into a socket.

Overall, the device makes a high-quality impression. It is made of plastic, has rounded corners and the USB-A connection also clearly defines which USB-C port is number one and number three. This is important because the strongest consumer should be plugged into the first port.

The original Apple power supply can handle the power peaks of over 80 watts that my MacBook Pro 15 inch (Intel) has under load. However, the new Apple Silicon Macs rarely need more than 20 watts and are therefore fully within the range that the Ugreen power supply can handle.

The original Apple power supply can handle the power peaks of over 80 watts that my MacBook Pro 15 inch (Intel) has under load. However, the new Apple Silicon Macs rarely need more than 20 watts and are therefore fully within the range that the Ugreen power supply can handle.

Is the power supply sufficient for an Intel MacBook Pro 15/16 inch?

The original Apple power supply has well over 80 watts, while the Ugreen can only deliver a maximum of 65 watts. This is not a bad thing, however, since measurements with my MacBook Pro 15 inch (Intel processor) have shown that it only consumes 60 watts even when the battery is half empty.

There were brief outliers in the measurements where the power went up to 80 watts, but that was only a few seconds. If this happens to the Ugreen power adapter, the MacBook Pro simply gets less power to charge the battery. You don't notice any impairment during operation.

Even if you charge an iPad or iPhone on the second USB-C port, the MacBook Pro will continue to charge - just not as fast as it would be on the Apple power supply. It then charges with approx. 40 watts.

On the left the Ugreen power supply, in the middle the Apple MacBook Pro power supply and on the right the USB-C power supply for the iPad Pro (Photo: Sir Apfelot).

On the left the Ugreen power supply, in the middle the Apple MacBook Pro power supply and on the right the USB-C power supply for the iPad Pro (Photo: Sir Apfelot).

No loading of MBP (Intel) possible with three devices

While the Ugreen power supply charges the MacBook Pro at port 1 with 20 volts if you only have two USB-C ports occupied, the charging voltage drops immediately to 15 volts and the power to 17 watts when you use all three ports. I did this with these devices:

  • Port 1: MacBook Pro 15 inch (Intel)
  • Port 2: iPad Pro 12,9 inch
  • Port 3: iPhone 12 Pro Max

In this constellation, the MacBook Pro no longer receives enough power to charge itself. So you should make sure that you only use two ports when a MacBook is attached to port 1.

Apple Silicon Macs change everything

I always wrote above that it was a MacBook Pro with an Intel processor. This is an important note, because my new MacBook Pro 13 inch with the Apple Silicon M1 processor is significantly more energy efficient and manages with almost 20 watts even under load ... the thing simply doesn't want more to keep the battery in operation to load.

In terms of power consumption, my 13-inch MacBook Pro is only slightly higher than my iPad Pro. That's a figure that is almost unbelievable when measured against the performance that the Mac offers.

The stand-by power consumption of the power supply was around 0,1 to 0,2 watts - that is, absolutely in the green area.

The stand-by power consumption of the power supply was around 0,1 to 0,2 watts - that is, absolutely in the green area.

Update 29.12.2020/XNUMX/XNUMX: USB-A port causes problems

I got the hint from my reader Volker that some people have problems when they have devices connected to the USB-A port AND to a USB-C port, so I have recreated this scenario. In fact, there was the phenomenon here that the iPhone kept restarting charging on the USB-A port or stopped charging at all.

You can find my long explanations on the matter in the comments below. There is only one thing to mention here: If you don't use the USB-A port, the charger works fine. Only when you plug a consumer into the USB-A port do the problems start. For this reason I would only like to make a limited recommendation here.

My conclusion on the Ugreen Multiport UBS-C power supply

If you own an Apple Silicon Mac, the Ugreen power supply is a perfect all-round device for charging Mac, iPad, iPhone and a power bank at the USB-C port.

For people with an old MacBook Pro that still works with Intel processors, a power supply with more power would make more sense. But I will soon have something on the test stand for that too - that much can be revealed.

Due to the problems with the USB-A port, I would only recommend the device to people who only want to use the USB-C ports. As soon as a consumer is plugged into the USB A port, very strange charging behavior or failures occur, which also affect the USB-C ports.

If you are interested in the Ugreen power supply, you will find it here at Amazon.

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14 comments

  1. Tobias G. says:

    Very informative article Thanks for that ????

    I am also considering buying this power supply. But I would still have a question about a certain constellation of devices, since the HomePod mini is apparently very picky about power / power supplies, I would be interested in the following:
    Does it work with the HomePod mini and if so with two and a power supply for a Nintendo Switch?

    I hope this absurd constellation can also be tested this way ????

    Mit freundlichen Grüßen
    Tobias

    • Jens Kleinholz says:

      Hello, tobias! As with MagSafe, I think it's a myth that the HomePod mini only likes certain power supplies. What I can understand is that he is expecting a power supply that can deliver 20 volts via USB Power Delivery. The Ugreen is able to do this ... which is why I can also use MagSafe. I don't have the HomePod mini or the Switch, but both devices use USB Power Delivery, which the Ugreen offers up to the highest voltage level. So it should work from my point of view.

  2. Detlef says:

    One major disadvantage of this device should be mentioned. If you have a MacBook connected to port 1, for example, and only one cable is connected to port 2 and port 3 without these devices being connected, the MacBook no longer delivers the full possible performance.

    • Jens Kleinholz says:

      Hello Detlef! Thanks for the hint. But apparently not quite right ... I just measured it on myself. Port 1 was my Intel MacBook Pro and loaded with over 40 watts. If I then plug a USB-C to USB-C cable into port 2 or 3, nothing happens. When I use a USB-C to Lightning cable, the power supply switches off for about 1 second and then on again, but port 1 still receives 20 volts and over 2 amps. Possibly then no more than 45 watts come from port 1, but my MacBook Pro did not draw that much in standby ... Basically, I would always disconnect the USB-C to Lightning fast charging cables, because they also consume some power "when not in use" so that all power packs and power banks keep active. But as I said: Thanks for the hint. I always think it's good when you get information that you haven't thought of yourself. LG and happy new year!

      • Volker says:

        I also think it is quite possible that problems arise if you do NOT use an MFI certified USB-C to Lightning cable.

        • Jens Kleinholz says:

          Hello Volker! So my cables are mfi certified. But I'll be happy to test your desired constellation again. Give me a few minutes. : D

  3. Volker Schäfer says:

    Hello, Jens!
    Please try the following constellation. Please only use C3 and the USB-A port. There are users who claim that the power supply then causes one restart after the other in the connected devices. I'm also interested in the part, but would consider buying it if the problem is described.

    LG and happy new year to 2021
    Volker

    • Jens Kleinholz says:

      Hello Volker! Very interesting thing. : D I tried the following scenario: iPhone 12 Pro Max via USB-A-to-Lightning on the USB-A port and the iPad Pro via USB-C-to-USB-C cable on port 3 of the charger. And what you described actually happened. The charging process on the iPhone was constantly restarting while the iPad Pro only charged for a few seconds and then no longer - although it was still plugged in.

      At first I thought it was due to the cable, but I have now gone through various brands from Anker, Cabeltex and original Apple and I keep getting the same problem with the USB-C ports: The device charges for a few seconds and then the charge indicator is gone, as if the cable were unplugged.

      The only way I didn't notice this in my tests is that the power adapter worked for a while, because I always check what percentage charge the power packs in a MacBook Pro or iPad Pro in 10 or 20 minutes or get an iPhone. If the tension had been gone after a few seconds, I would have managed 0% charge, which was definitely not the case.

      So no matter what the trigger: I would say the device has a flaw. Either ex works or after use. It doesn't matter either. I would no longer recommend it and write this later in the report so that no one sees it as a recommendation.

      Dear Volker, thanks to you for the helpful tip. It's nice to have such attentive readers! Have a happy new year to you too. LG!

      • Jens Kleinholz says:

        Hello Volker! Addendum: I've had the Ugreen charger lying in the corner for 10 minutes (without a power connection) and just plugged it in again because I just couldn't explain it to myself. Lo and behold: something has been reset and now it charges my USB-C power bank and my iPad Pro as if nothing had ever happened. As soon as I plug my iPhone into the USB-A port, the bickering starts again: The iPhone doesn't charge, and neither does the iPad Pro. If I use the USB A port alone, the iPhone will charge. If I only plug the iPad Pro into the USB C port, this also works. The charger seems to have a problem with the USB A port. But I have another interesting charger here that I will be testing shortly. Wait for it as this may be a better choice.

  4. Volker says:

    I'm curious.

  5. Marc says:

    This problem with the USB A port can already be seen in the table. A combination of USB A with USB C3 is not possible according to this. Only USB A with C1 and C2 should work….

    • Jens Kleinholz says:

      It didn't matter which USB C port I used. As soon as a USB C and USB A were in use, the charging process started over and over again. This is not the behavior that can be seen in the table. According to the table, it would only be critical if you use USB C3 and USB A. But it didn't work with USB C1 and USB C2 either.

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