UPS for the Mac - Which models and manufacturers are possible?

The UPS, i.e. the uninterruptible power supply, is used on the Mac and iMac to prevent damage to the computer in the event of a power failure. Because unlike a backup power supply (emergency power system), there is no interruption in the transition from the power grid to the alternative supply.

A UPS can protect the Apple computer from hardware and software damage both at home and in the company, as all projects and open files can be saved and the computer can be shut down in the event of an interruption in the power supply. Of course, this also applies to Windows PCs and other technical devices. Here you can find out which UPS models and manufacturers are suitable.

Uninterruptible power supply even in the event of a power failure, this is possible - at least for a few minutes - with a UPS device for the Apple Mac and Windows PC. But which manufacturers and models are suitable? Here is an attempt to answer the question.

Uninterruptible power supply even in the event of a power failure, this is possible - at least for a few minutes - with a UPS device for the Apple Mac and Windows PC. But which manufacturers and models are suitable? Here is an attempt to answer the question.

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Question from a reader about the uninterruptible power supply on the iMac

The topic was recently raised by a reader of this blog with her question:

In our small town, power outages have been increasing lately. My iMac (Retina 4K, 21,5 inches, end of 2015) unfortunately suffered damage on July 1st, so I had to completely rebuild it over the weekend. At the same time refreshed on Catalina. Can you recommend a UPS for the iMac? It has an HHD and the many power outages are not so healthy.

The question is not answered that quickly and easily, because there are UPS devices that in theory work with an iMac. However, some of the software that goes with it is out of date and therefore not compatible with current macOS versions such as Catalina. And others have no idea how long they can keep an iMac alive. After all, the 21,5-inch iMac consumes up to 120 watts under load. How many minutes can a UPS device deliver so that you have time to save everything and shut down the computer completely?

Further aspects when choosing the UPS for the Mac

In addition to the runtime in the event of a power failure, there are other questions. For example, some devices offer a USB port. Here you have to look carefully whether it is able to give the connected device (Apple Mac, Windows PC, NAS, server, etc.) the signal to shut down. Some cheap UPSs are just a simple USB charging port. Other quality features are replaceable batteries, standby power consumption, the availability of software for 64-bit macOS systems and, if necessary, ensuring a pure sine wave (if the end device requires it). Those who can do without the software should be able to recognize the power failure themselves.

Comparison of the manufacturers Legrand and CyberPower

A few of the UPS devices available on the market can be compared on the basis of some of the features shown. For the comparison here, after some research, I chose the manufacturers Legrand (model 310081) and CyberPower (model UT700EG). If you know a better device for the uninterruptible power supply on the computer, please leave a comment.

Legrand 310081 CyberPower UT700EG
Volt amperes 600 VA 700 VA
Watt 360 W 400 W
Energy consumption with charged battery (standby) approx. 10 to 11,5 watts approx. 2,5 to 2,8 watts
Schuko connections 6 (including 4 with overvoltage protection) 3
USB port 1 x USB-A (charging port) USB B 2.0
Ethernet connections none 1 x in, 1 x out
OS compatibility n / a Windows 10/7 / Server 2013/2012/2008, Linux
Additional Designed to be bridged for 15 minutes, output voltage at 230 V. Overvoltage and lightning protection, LED status display, automatic voltage regulation (165 V, 230 V, 290 V)
Price 95,59 Euros 63,10 Euros

UPS usage: standby costs should be taken into account

After the internal batteries of the UPS are charged, the device also consumes some when the power is passed through for the connected devices. As shown above, the manufacturer CyberPower's consumption is rather low, while Legrand has a higher demand. The Legrand model consumes an average of four times as much as that of CyberPower. Of course, this also results in costs that are four times as high, even if they are “only” in the one to two-digit euro range for a certain period of time. All in all, CyberPower delivers the better overall offer at a lower price.

Further CyberPower UPS recommendations for Mac, iMac and Co.

When I was looking for a UPS device for computers, especially for the Apple iMac, I came across other CyberPower products. Especially in one Forum thread the (successfully tested) use of the manufacturer's models was described. Those of the SineWave series deliver a pure sine wave, among other advantages. It was also reported that the connected Apple computers were automatically shut down - but an earlier version of macOS (10.13 High Sierra) was in use. 

Other UPSs offered by CyberPower that can be recommended are therefore the following:

If you have a different or better UPS device in use and can recommend it for the Apple iMac, iMac Pro, Mac Pro, Mac mini and other computers, please leave a comment. I look forward to your testimonials :)

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2 comments

  1. Renato says:

    Nothing for iMac / pro, but at least as an alternative for some Mac Minis it might be worth considering:

    Years ago I configured a server from a disused 2010 MacBook Pro ->

    - the built-in battery functions as a "free UPS"

    - Screen & keyboard are already on board (even if a server doesn't need it; but sometimes it's more convenient ...)

    - Unbeatable low idle power consumption

    - Even with an older model, performance is more than sufficient for typical home server tasks

    So for me the book has been “purring” reliably in 365 × 24 operation for many years….

    • sir appleot says:

      Hi Renato! Good idea. : D I don't have a UPS either ... my MacBook Pro is more or less protected. One reason why I always smile when there is a power failure while my wife is having a crisis on the iMac. ;-)

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