WordPress vs. Webflow - Which CMS is Better?

I use the CMS WordPress for many websites, as this is free in itself and because customers can make changes to the website themselves after a brief introduction. I recently switched to the WordPress alternative Webflow encountered, which looks quite interesting. Webflow is a bit like Jimdo or Wix, but from my point of view much more powerful and convenient to use. Therefore the question now arises: which content management system is better? How does the comparison of WordPress vs. Webflow turn out? Here you read my assessment.

TL; DR: View the WordPress alternative here

When comparing WordPress vs. Webflow, both offer advantages. If you just want to design a website individually, you can use Webflow. If you want to go into more detail and spend more time, you can use WordPress as a CMS.

When comparing WordPress vs. Webflow, both offer advantages. If you just want to design a website individually, you can use Webflow. If you want to go into more detail and spend more time, you can use WordPress as a CMS.

WordPress hurdle: updates for system and plugins

If you use WordPress, you have to update the system every now and then and also get updates for the installed plugins. If you use the CMS free of charge or in a small hosting package, this means additional work in addition to the other website maintenance; If you book an update service - for example from Strato or another service provider - it costs money. In some cases, the costs for the WordPress update service already correspond to an entire webflow package. So here it is important to see whether you really need WordPress or whether Webflow is not the better service with the more attractive price-performance ratio.

The big advantage of WordPress: Plugin selection for everything

Although they have to be kept up to date either manually or via a paid service, plugins are also the great strength of WordPress. Anyone who wants to use more than just a simple website, a standard blog or the unadjusted backend can implement all possible functions, options and abbreviations with such an extension. In this way, websites, shops, blogs and more web offers can be individually designed without having to have a lot of knowledge of programming or web design. But here, too, there is a downer: the plugins are often poorly programmed and may have security gaps or at least make the website slower.

Comparison of WordPress from Webflow

As you can see, WordPress is both a blessing and a curse - sometimes more, sometimes less, depending on the individual project. Detached from this, however, you can also set a few fixed points that can be used to compare the two systems. This will also give you a better picture of Webflow.

WordPress Webflow
Create your own design Existing themes can be used and adapted using plugins or your own coding; Knowledge of HTML and PHP is often a prerequisite for larger adjustments Here, too, there are free and "premium" templates, which can be redesigned quite intuitively without being able to use PHP and HTML (see modular principle)
Search engine optimization (SEO) Not possible from the start; you need at least one plugin like YoastSEO to do good SEO SEO options are included as Webflow is made for the modern internet
User friendliness in the CMS dashboard You have to get into it and adapt it with plugins; but it offers options that are irrelevant to most The dashboard is kept rather minimal; With Webflow, on-page editing of the website is in the foreground
Code quality Generally good - the more (semi-professional, free) plugins are used, the worse Webflow works fine without plugins and the code is designed for efficiency
SSL certificates You have to book SSL yourself with your hosting provider and then implement it in WordPress Free SSL on all pages and constant checking for security gaps
Side security With WordPress, the plugins are often a security hole through which hackers can penetrate Since Webflow is not open source and is automatically secured by its technician, there is little chance for hackers here
E-Mail E-mail functionality is usually included with the hosting provider and can be set up there here you have to use an external e-mail provider such as Zoho or GSuite, as Webflow does not have any mail servers
Support There is, but a lot is resolved through community requests, which can lead to delays FAQs, forum, contact form, social media and more

Webflow is ideal for anyone who “just wants a website”

Many companies or individuals want a website but are not familiar with creating or maintaining it. Why also? You are probably in a completely different subject and your job description has nothing to do with web design, coding or SEO.

And who of us nerds and geeks does not know the sentence “You know your way around computers, can you make me a website?” - it is correspondingly more formal when customers ask you to create a website. And it is precisely for such cases that Webflow seems to me to be a powerful tool. If someone wants an easy-to-use website, blog, shop or the like without having to deal with plugins, updates and backends, why not Webflow?

Have a look here: Official website of the provider

International, well-known companies also use Webflow for web projects. It's the same with WordPress, but you can already see that Webflow doesn't have to hold back here.

International, well-known companies also use Webflow for web projects. It's the same with WordPress, but you can already see that Webflow doesn't have to hold back here.

"Large" websites and blogs are also possible

However, because of its ease of use, Webflow should not be downgraded to a simple web construction kit. You can already see from their references that complex and extensive websites are possible with Webflow: Facebook, Twitter, Dell, CBS, MTV and many others use the system for some of their projects.

Webflow also offers a CMS functionality that can also be used to create blogs. There are numerous templates for this that are aimed directly at it.

My conclusion on the comparison of Webflow and WordPress

I think I will create the next websites for customers in Webflow, as WordPress is more likely to develop its advantages if you work with plugins for certain functions. If something like that is not needed, you don't have to put on the other stress that WP brings with it.

There are certainly still enough website projects for which Webflow's lack of freely developed plugins is more of an obstacle. Therefore I can only say in summary that there is no CMS winner for me, but that there is a tendency towards Webflow for the task under consideration here. As always, you have to consider the individual case in order to then decide which CMS offers the right advantages and functions.

-
 

 

Effectively for free: iPhone 13 Mini and iPhone 13 deals with top conditions at Otelo - Advertisement

2 comments

  1. Mausi says:

    Great report!
    I'm currently diving into Webflow (yeah, it takes a lot of training, but it's definitely worth it!) And I'm thrilled. I am a complete newcomer to web development, but I can get by with a lot of patience. And now after 2 simple one-page websites, I feel pretty safe. So, absolutely doable.
    You didn't mention one thing here: the speed. Webflow websites are super slim and fast.
    Am thrilled!

    • Sir Apfelot says:

      Yes, that's right. The pagespeed with WordPress is quickly in the basement if you (like me) use a bit of plugins and an old theme. But I couldn't create my blog with Webflow. There are so many individual stories in it that can probably only be realized with WordPress. But for the website for service providers or a small blog, Webflow is definitely a great thing.

Leave a Comment

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked with * .